Coal Mine & Cabot Trail Tour

Day 145: September 6 – Sydney 

My morning was spent lazing about.  In the afternoon I picked up a rental car and headed to the post office with all the gear I no longer need.  It seems odd to ship stuff home when I only have a couple days of cycling left but I hear Newfoundland is hilly and with less weight on the bike I’m hoping I have a better chance of pedalling more and walking less.  It’ll also be less to worry about when packing for the airport – with a bike, trailer, dog, remaining gear and only 2 hands I already have more than I can handle!  Besides, I was only going to ship the gear home if the price was right.  At $50 to send home my tent and the 2 front panniers full of stuff (mostly camping specific gear) the price was most certainly right.  The lady at the post office was super nice.  She was very concerned that my gear wasn’t locked and that it would be easy for somebody to open and snoop inside.  I figured the smell would be enough to deter any would be thieves, but she wasn’t satisfied with this rationale.  She dug up some plastic bags, put my gear in the plastic bags and then taped them up from top to bottom.  While she was taping the bags I couldn’t help but look around the post office at the red banner running along the top walls with the names of different towns and cities across Canada and realize that I now recognize a vast majority of those towns as I have rolled through them this summer!

After the post office I drove the 20km east to the Cape Breton Miners Museum in Glace Bay.  This was a Kaye recommendation, so I was looking forward to checking it out.  The museum has an exhibit area which was interesting, but the real highlight is the tour.  All tours are conducted by previous coal miners, so they bring a very personal touch to the tour.  My tour guide was Abbie, a 75 year old who spent 54 years of his life working in the coal mines.  His dad, grandfather, uncles and cousins were all coal miners as well.  The tour was about an hour long and we got to walk underground in a very small section of a previous mine.  All 50 coal mines on Cape Breton are now closed, the last one closed in 2001.  The population in the area has been decreasing as workers seek employment out west (sounds like most head to Alberta).  As a tour guide Abbie was fantastic, showing and explaining all the ‘factual’ information while adding some humour and his own personal stories he experienced first hand or stories that have been passed down to him from his father and grandfather.  Just like the underground tunnel tours in Moose Jaw, it shocks me how poorly some people in Canada were treated in recent history.

Entrance to the coal mine

Entrance to the coal mine

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Our guide in the coal mine: Abbie

Our guide in the coal mine: Abbie

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Can you imagine this being your work environment?

Can you imagine this being your work environment?

Coal

Coal

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An example of a pit pony

An example of a pit pony

Abbie demonstrating how they would start digging a new section of the mine

Abbie demonstrating how he and his partner (in most cases his dad) would setup a workstation to dig coal

To bring a little light into the miner's day one gentleman started a garden

To bring a little light into the miner’s day one gentleman started a garden

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The Cage (how the miner's got into the mine)

The Cage (how the miner’s got into the mine)

Thanks for the solid recommendation Kaye!  When I dreamed and planned this trip I didn’t realize what an educational experience it would be for me!

Day 146: September 7 – Cabot Trail

Leaving my bike at the hotel in Sydney, I headed west in the rental car and started my journey around the Cabot Trail.  I decided to head counter clockwise around the trail.  There wasn’t any logic for this, just started driving and that’s the direction I ended up heading.  I pulled over at Franey Trail and decided to go for a hike up the mountain.  The Franey trail is a 7.4km loop that starts at an elevation of 95m and ascends to 430m to a spectacular view of the ocean on one side and a canyon on the other side.  The climb up was certainly a steep one and took me about an hour.  I was impressed to find just how good my legs were feeling though.  I felt none of that soreness or aches that I felt in my quads when hiking on the west coast.  In fact, my calves felt almost spring like and when the climb wasn’t too steep I even managed a little hop, skip and jump.  Dash had absolutely no problem with the climb and when we got to the top a couple other groups that were soaking in the view commented somewhat surprised that such a small dog could climb all that way!  The hike down was more windy and gradual.

My first view of the Cabot Trail

My first view of the Cabot Trail

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Dash intrigued by another car ferry ride

Dash intrigued by another car ferry ride

View along the east side of the Cabot Trail

View along the east side of the Cabot Trail

Dash taking in the view

Dash taking in the view

Heading up the Franey Trail

Heading up the Franey Trail

And up, and up, and up

And up, and up, and up

Almost at the top

Almost at the top

Almost...

Almost…

Tada!  The highest point of the Franey Trail, and what's this?  A muskoka chair to relax in

Tada! The highest point of the Franey Trail, and what’s this? A muskoka chair to relax in

Water view from the top

Water view from the top

And another

And another

And another

And another

One last water view from the top of Franey Trail

One last water view from the top of Franey Trail

A selfie on the muskoka chair

A selfie on the muskoka chair

Me and Dash!

Me and Dash!

And the mountain side view form the top of Franey Trail

And the mountain side view form the top of Franey Trail

One with Dash and I in the frame

One with Dash and I in the frame

Heading down the trail

Heading down the trail

Notice the nicely groomed ATV trail - much easier for walking down then the trail up!

Notice the nicely groomed ATV trail – much easier for walking down then the trail up!

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A water stream along the way

A stream along the way

Some quick facts on the Franey Trail

Some quick facts on the Franey Trail

After a few hours on the trail I got back in the car and headed to Pleasant Bay (being about half way around the trail, this was my destination for the night), stopping at different lookout points along the way.  There are a lot of lookout points, definitely no shortage of place to pull over and take a look around at the magnificent views.

One of the many pull over spots along the Cabot Trail (this was still on the east side)

One of the many pull over spots along the Cabot Trail (this was still on the east side)

Lobster traps

Lobster traps

Fishing boat

Fishing boat

Small town along the cabot trail

Small town along the cabot trail

A valley along the northern end of the Cabot Trail

A valley along the northern side of the Cabot Trail

A shieling - would provide shelter for scottish farmers and often some of their livestock

A shieling – would provide shelter for scottish farmers and often some of their livestock

I was sound asleep by 9pm.

Day 147: September 8 – Cabot Trail

Continuing along the Cabot Trail I think it took me about 2 hrs to drive the 43km from Pleasant Bay to Cheticamp.  There were just soooo many lookout points and the scenery was always changing so I felt I had to stop at almost every lookout point to absorb my surroundings.  I’ll post lots of pics here when I get back to Toronto.  This was my favourite stretch of road along the cabot trail.

The motel's backdrop in Pleasant Bay

The motel’s backdrop in Pleasant Bay

Pleasant Bay

Pleasant Bay

Where I had a seafood platter the previous night

Where I had a seafood platter the previous night

Now on the west side of the cabot trail

Now on the west side of the cabot trail

MacKenzie River Valley

MacKenzie River Valley

Another pic of MacKenzie River Valley.  Notice that the mountains all appear to plateau (no peaks), this is because the hard rock that forms these mountains do no succumb to erosion easily

Another pic of MacKenzie River Valley. Notice that the mountains all appear to plateau (no peaks), this is because the rock that forms these mountains do no succumb to erosion

A pond at the top of one of the mountains

A pond at the top of one of the mountains

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Dash was not inclined to come outside when it started raining

Dash was not inclined to come outside when it started raining

West side of the Cabot Trail (between Pleasant Bay and Cheticamp)

West side of the Cabot Trail (between Pleasant Bay and Cheticamp)

If dogs could talk I think Dash would have some choice words with me for bringing her out into the rain! lol!

If dogs could talk I think Dash would have some choice words with me for bringing her out into the rain! lol!

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Looking at the rock formations

Looking at the rock formations

And closer up

And closer up

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Colorful coastal homes

Colorful coastal homes

P1050024P1050025From Cheticamp I headed to Baddeck and spent a couple hours exploring the Alexander Graham Bell museum.  He and his wife had a vacation home in Baddeck where Alexander Graham Bell toiled with many of his other inventions (beyond the telephone).  In fact, the first Canadian powered flight took place in Feb. 2009 over the frozen Bras d’Or Lake with the ‘Silver Dart’ aircraft that was built by a team which included Bell.

By the Alexander Graham Bell museum, overlooking Bras d'Or Lake

By the Alexander Graham Bell museum, overlooking Bras d’Or Lake

Why the Bell's chose to make Baddeck, NS their vacation home

Why the Bell’s chose to make Baddeck, NS their vacation home

Alexander Graham Bell toyed with many inventions one being a flying bike

Alexander Graham Bell toyed with many inventions one being a flying bike

This quote spoke to me

This quote spoke to me

The Road Less Travelled

Day 139: August 31 – Amherst to Seafoam

Daily Distance = 115.03km, Trip Total = 5,544.93km

I knew today was going to be a long ride because of the lack of campgrounds along my chosen route, so I had the best of intentions of getting on the road by 8:30 at the latest.  Although I woke up plenty early, I was slow moving and didn’t leave the hotel ’till 9:30.

I had done some research last night on the different route options between Amherst and New Glasgow.  Originally my intention was to take the Trans Canada (hwy 104), but having driven it on my little road trip the past couple days I wasn’t particularly thrilled about the lack of shoulder in spots and the speed of traffic.  Although I’m sure it would have been perfectly safe given there were two lanes in each direction and traffic would have been able to move around me, it just didn’t seem like it was going to be a relaxed bike ride.  So I decided instead to head along hwy 6 which appeared on the maps to be a quieter road.  It had the added bonus of being near the water and we’ve already established how much I am drawn to water.  Although hwy 6 did not have a shoulder, traffic was pretty quiet and incredibly good about moving over for me.  Apparently Nova Scotia has a ‘1 metre rule’ – meaning cars are to give cyclists a 1 metre berth when passing.  It’s clear not everybody is aware of this rule (or chooses to abide by it), but I found on the country roads the vast majority of motorists do follow the 1 metre rule.

Heading East on why 6 from Amherst (the sunrise trail)

Heading East on why 6 from Amherst (the sunrise trail)

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Farmland along the way

Farmland along the way

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A hint of water in the background

A hint of water in the background

Horse riding facility along hwy 6

Horse riding facility along hwy 6

Because of my late departure this morning, the amount of ground that I needed to cover and the hilly terrain (not steep hills, just constant rolling hills) I didn’t take many breaks.  However I did have one pleasant break along the water while I watched a couple kayakers head out for a paddle.  As well as a break in front of a grocery store while I wolfed down a chicken sandwich.

First break spot of the day

First break spot of the day

Watching some kite surfers

Watching some kite surfers

Just enjoying the view

Just enjoying the view

Back on the road, passing by a mill town

Back on the road, passing by a mill town

Haven't seen a blue heron for a while

Haven’t seen a blue heron for a while

A little nervous about those hills in the distance...

A little nervous about those hills in the distance…

Cows!

Cows!

A quick pit stop along the sunrise trail

A quick pit stop along the sunrise trail

Uh-oh - I'm actually going in the direction of those hills now...

Uh-oh – I’m actually going in the direction of those hills now…

And they appear to be getting closer...

And they appear to be getting closer…

Passing through Tatamagouche

Passing through Tatamagouche

…and closer...

…and closer…

Oh good, the hills are out of view now.  Let's not think of them!

Oh good, the hills are out of view now. Let’s not think of them!

When I arrived at the campground at 7pm (this is a late arrival for me), the lady told me they didn’t have any tent sites available.  When I told her that I was on a bicycle she asked where I had come from today.  As soon as I said Amherst suddenly a site became available.  I was more surprised to find when I got to the 6 tent sites in the campground that only 3 were actually taken.  Odd. I quickly setup camp, showered, and cooked dinner just before darkness set.  Shortly after sunset there was a firework display, I took Dash for a stroll around the campground and I was out like a light!

Dinner in the dark

Dinner in the dark

The reflectors on my tent and bike have come in handy when wandering at night (not that this has happened often)

The reflectors on my tent and bike have come in handy when wandering at night (not that this has happened often)

 

Day 140: September 1 – Seafoam to New Glasgow

Daily Distance = 39.43km, Trip Total = 5,584.36km

The forecast today was rain.  And a lot of it.  So I was glad I had covered a lot of ground yesterday and had relatively little to cover today.  I was also glad that although it did rain overnight, it stopped just long enough in the morning for me to pack up camp.  As I rolled out of camp it started to pour.  I had to laugh, the timing couldn’t have been more perfect – better for it to start raining when I’m on the bike then when I’m trying to setup or take down camp.  Turns out that stint of rain only lasted about 10 minutes and I actually enjoyed a rain free ride for a couple hours.  I did however get greeted with a constant wall of rain for the last 8km of the ride.

A lavender farm

A lavender farm (apparently there was a spot of rain on my camera lens)

I really do enjoy riding on these quiet country roads

I really do enjoy riding on these quiet country roads

Not sure what kind of factory this was

Not sure what kind of factory this was

Entering a causeway just north of Pictou

Entering a causeway just north of Pictou

The view to the East from the causeway

The view to the East from the causeway

And the view to the West

And the view to the West

And me at the end of the causeway

And me at the end of the causeway

As for the ride itself – the hills started getting bigger (2-3km climbs vs short rolling hills), but the grade was not as steep, I prefer these lesser grade hills even if they are a longer climb!  Near Pictou I turned on to 106 and was surprised to find just how busy this road was.  Hwy 106 leads to the ferry to PEI, so I kindof suspected the traffic to ebb and flow with the ferry crossings, which was approx every two hours.  How wrong I was.  The traffic seemed constant.  On the plus, for the most part there was a paved shoulder.  A couple kilometre’s from my destination I turned on to Hwy 104 and was not entirely surprised to see that the paved shoulder was almost non-existent.  Given the heavy rain and reduced visibility at this point (several cars were even putting on their 4 ways) I opted to cycle on the gravel shoulder.  What a good day to only have to ride 40km!  I reached my destination by 1pm and quickly checked in and started hanging all my stuff in the room to dry.

It doesn't look like much, but trust me, this hill stretched on for a couple km's

It doesn’t look like much, but trust me, this hill stretched on for a couple km’s

Another steady climb

Another steady climb

The afternoon was spent researching route options for the next four days.  After the past two days ride I’ve solidified my decision to take the quiet country roads wherever reasonably possible.

Day 141: September 2 – New Glasgow to Antigonish

Daily Distance = 61.70km, Trip Total = 5,646.06km

As I headed into the downtown core of New Glasgow I noticed a secondary language on the signs.  What is this?  Gaelic!

New Glasgow

New Glasgow

Downtown New Glasgow

Downtown New Glasgow

English and Gaelic signs

English and Gaelic signs

Old why 4 just outside of New Glasgow

Old why 4 just outside of New Glasgow

I trucked out of New Glasgow (after a brief convo with a local) on hwy 4.  Around 15km hwy 4 merged with hwy 104 (the trans canada).  Or so I thought.  I hopped on to hwy 104 and went down a decent sized hill and then began an uphill climb when I noticed two things: 1) a passing lane opened up and with that the paved shoulder was non-existent and 2) there was in fact a road to my right, it looked like 4 actually ran parallel to 104 for a little stretch.

Why am I on the busy road?!?!

I had no desire to climb back up the hill I just went down to meet back up with hwy 4, so I eyed up the huge ditch between the two roads and decided it was something I could push my cargo across.  A few minutes later I was once again on my nice quiet country road.  Awwwwww.

Overpass over TransCanada 104

Overpass over TransCanada 104

This sign should have been my first indication that old hwy 4 continued and I didn't have to get on 104, I must not have been paying attention at the time...

This sign should have been my first indication that old hwy 4 continued and I didn’t have to get on 104, I must not have been paying attention at the time…

Instead I got on 104 and decided to take this ditch down to the old hwy 4

Instead I got on 104 and decided to take this ditch down to the old hwy 4

Today’s scenery was wonderful.  Forested, hilly terrain with the occasional small area cleared out providing a nice view of the surrounding hills.  I haven’t quite pinpointed why, but the forest here is so much more scenic than the forested ride through New Brunswick.  The majority of the first 40km were spent gradually climbing with short, quick drops and the last 20km were spent mostly coasting into the town of Antigonish.  Mother nature treated me to about a 2hr mist in the middle of today’s ride that was great for keeping me cool while chugging up the hills.

What much of today looked like - so relaxing, huh?

What much of today looked like – so relaxing, huh?

A perfect break spot

A perfect break spot

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It may look like I'm grimacing, but that's just exertion.  It was hilly today!

It may look like I’m grimacing, but that’s just exertion. It was hilly today!

I’m not entirely sure when this happened – maybe 2 or 3 weeks ago, but I’ve found that I’ve stopped listening to my music when riding.  Perhaps it was done subconsciously to allow me to better hear the approach of potential wildlife?  Perhaps.  But I think it is so I can better absorb my surroundings.  My music now is the sound of birds chirping, the occasional scamper of a critter in the ditch scurrying off into the woods when they hear my bike, the soothing sound of water as I glide by a small creek or waterfall hidden in the forest, the sound of my wheels rolling along pavement and the slightly increasing creaks and groans of my bike and Dash’s trailer.

One of the rippling streams that accented my backdrop today

One of the rippling streams that accented my backdrop today

Looking ahead at what's to come

Looking ahead at what’s to come

Another break spot

Another break spot

Dash waiting patiently at the door.  Perhaps she thinks the ride is done for the day??

Dash waiting patiently at the door. Perhaps she thinks the ride is done for the day??

P1040759Around the 40km mark hwy 4 merged up with the busier hwy 104, I had no choice but to take this road for about 5km.  Shortly after I pulled onto hwy 104 I noticed that distant spec in my mirror!  Another tourer!  When he caught up to me I was surprised to find that he was also hauling a dog in a trailer!  A 50lb golden retriever no less!  His name is Jason and was heading from Montreal to St. John’s.  It was difficult to talk because of the noise of the traffic and we couldn’t ride side by side given the width of our trailers, so after a few minutes of trying to chat we parted ways.

Another tourer, WITH A DOG!!!

Another tourer, WITH A DOG!!!

Our trailers were too wide for us to ride side by side on this busy road

Our trailers were too wide for us to ride side by side on this busy road

The other tourer pulling away from me

The other tourer pulling away from me

P1040763When I arrived in Antigonish I cleaned up and went for a little stroll around town.  Given it was labour day Monday and Antigonish is a small university town (St. Frances Xavier University), the town was alive with students back for another year at school.

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Downtown Antigonish

Looking back at St. Francis Xavier University

Downtown Antigonish

Downtown Antigonish

A memorial to the Scottish heritage of Nova Scotia

A memorial to the Scottish heritage of Nova Scotia

Another tiring day for Dash!

Another tiring day for Dash!

 

 

Day 142: September 3 – Antigonish to Port Hawkesbury

Daily Distance = 61.98km, Trip Total = 5,708.04km

I left the hotel early today, around 9am because they were calling for both headwinds and rain to increase throughout the day.  I made a quick stop at the Tall and Small Cafe and picked up a cookie as a treat (thanks Danielle for the recommendation!).

I spent the first stretch on hwy 104 where I was quickly past by a couple.  As they past me the lady hollered out ‘are you almost done your trip too?  Heading to St. John’s?’, I quickly hollered back ‘yup’ and they were speeding off.

Fellow trans canada tourists

Fellow trans canada tourists

I was expecting to find the hwy 4 turnoff around the 18km mark, according to my iPhone hwy 4 is also referred to as the Sunrise Trail in this area, so when I saw a sign for the Sunrise Trail I was quick to take the road without double-checking my location on the iphone maps app.  When I first turned on to the road I was a bit surprised that it headed slightly NW, given my primary direction today was to be east.  But then it corrected slightly and just headed north.  I thought I would ride for a little bit and see whether it started to veer east.  After about a kilometre of heading due north I pulled over and consulted with my phone.  Turns out I took an exit a couple hundred metres too early.  However this road would eventually head east and meet up with hwy 4.  I was already one kilometre in so I decided to just go with it and was graced with some nice water views.  And I think every single car that past me waved – so friendly!

A small church along my self imposed unexpected detour

A small church along my self imposed unexpected detour

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Water views off the beaten path

Water views off the beaten path

More water views

More water views

Back on the 'planned' route!

Back on the ‘planned’ route!

Passing by a blueberry farm

Passing by a blueberry farm

Old hwy 4

Old hwy 4

I eventually got to the Canso Causeway which links Cape Breton to the mainland.  With the 50km/hr crosswind that wanted to constantly drift me in to traffic this was not a particularly enjoyable crossing.  Nor was the kilometre climb on the other side of the causeway along 104 that had no paved shoulder and even though traffic had a passing lane with nobody in the left hand lane, they would continue to whiz by me down the middle of the right hand lane.  Urgh!  A plea to motorists – when a cyclist is contending with a hill, rain, no shoulder, a strong head or cross wind and are loaded down with 100+ lbs of gear and you are in your nice cozy car with two lanes at your disposable can you just move over???  Although the cyclist is doing their darnest to not drift into traffic those are a lot of variable that are not working in the cyclists favour.  Ok – that will hopefully be my only motorist rant.  Needless to say, I was happy to be off the road and at my destination shortly after crossing the Canso Causeway.

My first glimpse of Cape Breton Island

My first glimpse of Cape Breton Island

And another - looks hilly!

And another – looks hilly!

Altho I had hills to get to the Island as well...

Altho I had hills to get to the Island as well…

Meeting a friend

Meeting a friend

Crossing the Canso Causeway was not a particularly pleasant experience on a bike

Crossing the Canso Causeway was not a particularly pleasant experience on a bike

Shortly after pulling into my hotel I spotted a tourer across the street.  I gave a big wave and he came over to chat a bit.  He is from Montreal, biked from Montreal did a loop around the cabot trail and is now on his way back to home – he still has a bit of ground to cover!  I won’t be the last tourer on the Canadian roads this summer!

I have to give a quick shout out to Carolyn at Ship2Shore for scheduling my flight home (and registering Dash on said flight).  Thanks for looking after this for me Carolyn!  Hard to believe, but it is time to start thinking of returning home!

Day 143: September 4 – Port Hawkesbury to St. Peter’s

Daily Distance = 50.17km, Trip Total = 5,758.21km

When I stepped into the hotel breakfast room this morning I was surprised to see the couple who had passed me on the road earlier in the day yesterday!  The lady was chatting up another couple about their cycling adventure across Canada this summer.

As I got on the road, I knew I would be on the same road I wasn’t entirely pleased with yesterday afternoon for about 5km, at which point hwy 4 and 104 once again split.  Oddly enough ALL the traffic this morning generously moved into the left hand passing lane for me.  Not sure what was different this morning vs yesterday afternoon, but I’ll take it!  While on this road, I crossed Jason (the guy with the 50lb dog), he said he has decided to take the newer route along 105 on the north side of Bras d’Or Lake.  I wished him safe travels as I headed for the south side of Bras d’Or Lake a large salt water inland sea.

It’s a good thing I have a new found appreciation for hills, ‘cuz it was another hilly one today.  But the grades were manageable and it was a pleasant ride.  It was another rainy day and about half way into the ride a fairly heavy fog set in.  The relatively light traffic didn’t seem to have any problem seeing all my fluorescent gear.  However the fog did hinder my ability to gawk at the scenery around me – hopefully I didn’t miss much!

A little foggy in the distance

A little foggy in the distance

The fog is a little closer

The fog is a little closer

And closer still

And closer still

Foggiest part of the whole trip!  Can you pick out the oncoming headlights?

Foggiest part of the whole trip! Can you pick out the oncoming headlights?

I arrived in St. Peter’s shortly after 2pm to the now familiar faces of the couple from breakfast.  They were staying at the same inn as me.  This was a very small 8 unit inn and we were the only patrons, however the rooms were very spacious and well taken care of.  After checking in and noticing that I had a fridge I headed over to the grocery store to pick up some fruit, veggies, yogurt and chocolate milk for an afternoon snack and breakfast tomorrow.  By the time I got back from picking up the groceries I was surprised to find that the power was out.  I put everything in the fridge anyway hoping the power would come back on and some of it would be salvageable.  Because it was still relatively early in the day I headed out for a walk along the canal and Battery Provincial Park.  Around 10:30 the power came back, so my groceries would not go to waste!

Dash meeting a fellow canine

Dash meeting a fellow canine

Canal in St. Peter's

Canal in St. Peter’s

St. Peter's Canal

St. Peter’s Canal

Info on the lock in St. Peter's

Info on the lock in St. Peter’s

St. Peter's canal and lock

St. Peter’s canal and lock

 

Day 144: September 5 – St. Peter’s to Sydney

Daily Distance = 84.62km, Trip Total = 5,842.83km

The forecast was calling for sun today.  For a while at least.  The rain wasn’t expected to start until the afternoon.  And winds (headwinds) were supposed to pick up during the day as well.  So I had a target of getting on the road by 9am and I actually made that target!

It was another hilly day (are you noticing the Nova Scotia trend? – hills and rain!), but unfortunately for me today the grade of several of the hills got that little bit steeper so I did a decent amount of walking today.  All the more to take in the scenery around me, right?  Scenic views they were too, as today I spent the majority of the day cycling along the southern coast of Bras d’Or Lake which at times had nice level sandy beaches and at other times had cliffs on the waters edge.

Given the views today I was happy to be out of yesterday's fog

Given the views today I was happy to be out of yesterday’s fog

Still hilly today

Still hilly today

Looking out at Bras d'Or Lake

Looking out at Bras d’Or Lake

Traffic today was a bit busier than the previous days along hwy 4, as hwy 104 no longer exists, but I found it to still be a safe ride.  The first 20km the road was a bit rough with pot holes and then there was a 5km stretch of construction (which was actually nice ‘cuz it slows down what traffic there is) and the rest of the road was quite pleasant.  It looks like this road has likely been re-paved and slightly widened in the somewhat recent past.  There is not a paved shoulder but the road is wide enough that 2 cars and a cyclist can all pass at once, although I found when this situation did occur the vehicle behind me would slow down and wait until the coast was clear – which I appreciated.

Over half the day was spent riding alongside Bras d'Or Lake

Over half the day was spent riding alongside Bras d’Or Lake

P1040830P1040831In Big Pond I pulled over at Rita’s Tea Room for a break.  This was owned by Rita MacNeil.  Just as I pulled in there were a group of about 9 ladies who were heading in for a lunch reunion.  They were quite taken both by Dash and my journey and immediately greeted me to Cape Breton.  There was a flurry of pictures as they asked me to take pictures of them (on a couple cameras) and then they asked to take pictures of me, me with the bike, me with the bike and Dash, etc.  It was pretty funny.  I didn’t stick around long as I wanted to try to beat as much of the approaching rain/wind as possible.  So after a quick tour of the Tea Room, a washroom break, a protein bar and some beef jerky I was back on the road.

In front of Rita's team room

In front of Rita’s team room

Starting to get to the narrower parts of Bras d'Or Lake

Starting to get to the narrower parts of Bras d’Or Lake

About 35km from my destination the sun disappeared and the sky clouded over and the winds start picking up ever so slightly.  At this point I stop hoping that I’ll out bike the rain and instead just be happy with every extra km I’m able to cycle dry.  15km later I arrive in East Bay, I’m only 20km from my destination and I still haven’t been rained on.  Better yet – the road now has a paved shoulder for cyclists – I was not expecting this at all but I do like it as traffic has started to pick up a bit.  Winds are getting a bit stronger too, but that just motivates me to keep pushing.  It helps that the grade of the hills are not as steep and I can actually pedal my way up them.  Another 10km pass, I’m skirting into the edges of the city and only 10km from my destination and still no rain!  By 4:30 I’m safely at the hotel and I didn’t get rained on.  Around 5pm I look out the window and notice that the rain has started.  Just in the nick of time!  Although my thighs are buzzing from how much I pushed them not just today to beat the rain, but the hilly terrain over the past few days, I have to smile.  There’s something that feels good about sore muscles from a workout.

Workplace hazards of cycling on the sidewalk - dodging sign frames!

Workplace hazards of cycling on the sidewalk – dodging sign frames!

East Coast Road Trip

Day 134: August 26 – Prince Edward Island

This morning I was looking forward to picking up a rental car for a few days and do a quick scoot around the East Coast to some of the areas that were a bit further out of the way from my intended route and I felt needed to be checked out while in the area.

Before picking up the rental car I somewhat hesitantly asked the folks at the Comfort Inn in Amherst whether they had a safe place for my bike for a few days.  They were very receptive to this request and offered up some floor space in the electrical room.  Much better than taking the bike apart and fitting it in the car!

After a surprisingly smooth process of picking up the rental car and packing all my gear into the car I was off to PEI via the 12.9km confederation bridge which connects the island to the mainland.

The Confederation Bridge to PEI

The Confederation Bridge to PEI

My first stop in PEI was Summerside – a cute little town on the south coast where I picked up a salad from Wendy’s and walked along the waterfront boardwalk for about an hour and checked out the wharf area.  After Summerside I headed to Cavendish on the north coast.  I’m sure most people know this is where author Lucy Maud Montgomery was raised by her grandparents and is the background for the Anne of Green Gables novels.  I can’t say I’ve ever read the novels, or watched The Road to Avonlea TV series (that I can recall) however I’ve heard the scenery in this area is spectacular, so I had to check it out.  I wasn’t disappointed.  The red rocky/sandy cliffs and ocean views are spectacular.  I spent about 4hrs checking out different little pockets in the area, hiking and in some cases just sitting around taking in the view with the sound of the water as my music!  I also did a super quick (about 15min) tour of the Avonlea Village where my main highlight was stopping for a COWS ice cream – voted best ice cream in Canada by Reader’s Digest.

A view of PEI's red sand

A view of PEI’s red sand

Farmland across the water

Farmland across the water

Harbour in Summerside

Harbour in Summerside

The wharf in Summerside

The wharf in Summerside

Walking along the boardwalk in Summerside

Walking along the boardwalk in Summerside

Don't these cows have a great view?

Don’t these cows have a great view?

The home Lucy Maud Montgomery grew up in

The home Lucy Maud Montgomery grew up in

An afternoon spent in Cavendish

An afternoon spent in Cavendish

Cavendish cliffs

Cavendish cliffs

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Evidence of the cliff erosion

Evidence of the cliff erosion

Awwww - this is peaceful

Awwww – this is peaceful

Dash and I soaking up the view

Dash and I soaking up the view in Cavendish

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Watching some kids ride the water

Watching some kids ride the water

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Still in the Cavendish area

Still in the Cavendish area

A flock of black guillemot

A flock of black guillemot

A closer view of the black guillemot

A closer view of the black guillemot

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Dunes in Cavendish by the beach

Dunes in Cavendish by the beach

Dunes

Dunes

Forested area in Cavendish

Forested area in Cavendish

Cavendish Beach

Cavendish Beach

Water temperature of 18 degrees - almost as warm as the air temperature of 22 degrees!

Water temperature of 18 degrees – almost as warm as the air temperature of 22 degrees!

Dash an dI taking a walk through the forest

Dash an dI taking a walk through the forest

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The school Lucy Maud Montgomery went to

Belmont School – where Lucy Maud Montgomery taught from 1896-97

Avonlea village

Avonlea village

After leaving Cavendish I headed to Charlottetown, checked into my hotel, grabbed some dinner and quickly fell asleep.

Inland PEI

Inland PEI – on my way from Cavendish to Charlottetown

Day 135: August 27 – Halifax

It was about a four hour drive from Charlottetown to Halifax, my first destination in Halifax was MEC for my final major supply re-stock of the trip!  And I really didn’t have much to pick up, just one more dehydrated food dinner and a handful of protein bars, energy gels and energy jubes.  It was good that I only needed a quick stop because I was having a hard time finding parking downtown Halifax and ended up making my own parking spot in front of the store.  I wasn’t blocking anybody or in anybody’s way so as long as a parking attendant didn’t come by I figured I’d be ok.  I immediately then headed over to the hotel, checked in and took a couple hours rest – driving seems more tiring than cycling sometimes!

Cows creamery in Charlottetown

Cows creamery in Charlottetown

Driving across the Confederation Bridge

Driving across the Confederation Bridge

Nova Scotia!  Again!

Nova Scotia! Again!

At the Nova Scotia tourist info

At the Nova Scotia tourist info

Around 6pm I headed out for a stroll and walked around the Halifax Citadel a large fort in Halifax that sits atop a large hill near downtown.  The views from here are not to be missed if you are in the area.

Halifax harbour from the Citadel

Halifax harbour from the Citadel

The clock tower at the Halifax Citadel

The clock tower at the Halifax Citadel

An island in Halifax harbour

An island in Halifax harbour

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The current view of where the explosion mentioned above happened

The current view of where the explosion mentioned above happened

Looking back at the clock tower on the way down to the waterfront

Looking back at the clock tower on the way down to the waterfront

My next stop was the downtown core where I spent a couple hours walking (very slowly) along the waterfront boardwalk.  I was hoping to catch some of Signal Hill’s (an east coast band) set at the Lower Deck, but I was too tired to hang around beyond 9pm so I had to pass on that opportunity.  I did however take the opportunity to try a Beaver Tail – a fried doughy pastry that is stretched into the shape of a beaver tail with different toppings (my choice was hazelnut spread with reese’s pieces).  Otherwise it was a pleasant early evening strolling along the water.

City Hall.  This is where Dalhousie University used to be

City Hall. This is where Dalhousie University used to be

Thomas the Tank Engine boat

Thomas the Tank Engine boat

Historic Properties at the Halifax Wharf

Historic Properties at the Halifax Wharf

Some of the historic buildings

Some of the historic buildings

Along the Halifax Wharf

Along the Halifax Wharf

A view of the water from the wharf

A view of the water from the wharf

An old ship and a cruise ship in the harbour

An old ship and a cruise ship in the harbour

This ship had to get rescued and towed back to land

This ship had to get rescued and with assistance made it back to land

Riding the wave

Riding the wave

An island in the harbour

An island in the harbour

Looking at the harbour as the sun is setting

Looking at the harbour as the sun is setting

I liked the colour of the planes airstream

I liked the colour of the planes airstream

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Halifax from the top of the Citadel at night

Halifax from the top of the Citadel at night

 

Day 136: August 28 – Digby & Digby Neck

My goal was to be on the road by 9am today, but surprisingly enough I woke up before my alarm and was on the road shortly after 8am.  I had another 4hr drive ahead of me today as I was heading to Tiverton (a very small town on Long Island in the Digby Neck area) to go Whale Watching.  This is an excursion I have been looking forward to for a LONG time!  I was scheduled for the 2pm excursion which meant I would have to be at the ferry to cross over to Long Island by 1:30pm (the ferry only leaves once an hour on the half).  I actually made it to the ferry by 12pm and was just getting ready for the 1/2hr wait when the ferry made an unexpected trip and took us on the 5min trip across to Long Island at noon.  Apparently there was an overload of traffic from the other side (which crosses once an hour on the hour), so they had to go back to pick up the overload anyway.  I stopped in at the Ocean Explorations office where I was informed that they still had space on the 12:30 excursion – how is that for things falling in to place?  I told the lady that I had a dog in my car and asked her if there was a shady spot to park, she immediately walked me over to a driveway that had a canopy of trees.  She did offer to leave Dash in the office, but given Dash’s sometimes yappy nature I wasn’t sure that would be a good idea when they are trying to run a business.  Regardless, I left the windows wide open, it was foggy and overcast and only in the mid-teens temperature wise, I left my keys with the lady at the office just in case the car needed to be moved and she also offered to check in on Dash once and a while – soooo kind and accommodating!

In the Annapolis Valley area on my way to Tiverton

In the Annapolis Valley area on my way to Tiverton

Ferry to Tiverton

Ferry to Tiverton

Dash was quite curious about the movement of the ferry

Dash was quite curious about the movement of the car ferry

After I knew Dash was going to be in good hands it was pretty much time to get ready for the tour.  I was going on a zodiac so there were only 12 of us (plus the tour guide Tom) on the tour.  We were all given flotation suits to wear (not just a life vest or jacket, but a full suit with long sleeves, long pants and a hood).  I chatted a bit with an elderly couple who were sharing some of the same nervous excitement I had!  We walked down to the docks and watched as our tiny, tiny zodiac pulled in.

Ocean Explorations office

Ocean Explorations office

 

Suited up!

Suited up!

See that spec in the middle right of the frame?  That's our zodiac

See that spec in the middle of the frame? That’s our zodiac

The size of our zodiac compared to what other companies take out for whale watching

The size of our zodiac compared to what other companies take out for whale watching

After we were all settled in the zodiac Tom was quick to pull us away from the docks and we were heading out into the Bay of Fundy.  Tom told us to keep our eyes peeled for any sightings and to let the group know if any are spotted.  The zodiac can travel at a speed of about 20-30km/hr, so the ride alone was quite a thrill.  About 5min in we spotted a spec ahead of us, as we got closer we saw that it was a grey seal.  Tom was quick to tell us that we can look for seals later – right now we want to find whales or dolphins!  About 20min later of zipping along the bay we started to spot fins in the distance – sure enough – dolphins.  Atlantic white-sided dolphins (as per Tom).  They were jumping out of the water everywhere – but I was always too slow with the camera so I think I only got some pictures of fins and the water disturbance after they jumped!  Oh well!  It was pretty cool, the dolphins actually seemed a bit interested in playing with us and ‘swimming’ with the boat for a while as they quite literally followed the boat jumping on either side of us.  After about 15min of this Tom told us that he was going to pull the zodiac away from the dolphins so we could continue looking for whales.  Once we were removed from the school of dolphins Tom shut off the zodiac and told us to listen for the sound of a whale blowing water out of its blowhole.  Because it was a bit foggy our visibility was  reduced so he thought this would be the quickest way for us to find some whales.  No less than 1 minute after the zodiac was shut off we all heard a noise to our left.  Tom quickly turned the zodiac back on and off we were – looking for whales!  A couple minutes later we saw them!  A group of 4 humpback whales hanging out near the surface of the water.

Tour guide Tom

Tour guide Tom

It was a bit foggy when we first set out

It was a bit foggy when we first set out

I was always too slow to get a picture of the dolphins mid jump

I was always too slow to get a picture of the dolphins mid jump

The dolphins swimming with our boat

The dolphins swimming with our boat

And the last of my dolphin shots (the rest of the dolphin pics were just ripples of water)

And the last of my dolphin shots (the rest of the dolphin pics were just ripples of water)

As per Tom, these humpback whales spend their summers in the bay of fundy primarily eating.  They will usually spend about 5-8 minutes breathing near the surface and then they will go under to eat for about 5-8 minutes and then return to the surface to breath and repeat.  Just before they go under the water they give a bigger breath and then they roll their body a bit and the tail comes completely out of the water and gracefully goes under water.  At one point one whale did actually temporarily lift her head out of the water, but I was too busy watching the moment to catch it on film.  It was also kind of cool to see the green-flourescent hue that gets reflected off the whales white pectoral fins – I don’t think this picked up on the pictures.  We watched this group of 4 whales for about 4 rounds of them breathing near the surface and then heading under to eat.  About an hour later we decided to leave these 4 whales and see if we could find any others.  Within a few minutes we were able to hear the now familiar noise of a whale breathing and when we reached the source of the sound we saw a mother and her calf (humpbacks again).  We probably spent about 15min watching these two and got to see the calf do a roll on to its back (again no pictures).  These two seemed to be taking a break from eating as they spent the whole 15 minutes hanging out near the surface.  Unfortunately our time was winding down, so we had to head back to the docks and leave the whales.  On our way back we stopped at a cove area that grey seals tend to hang out in and so we spent a few minutes watching the seals before finishing our ride.  All in all, a successful excursion!

Here’s a clip of two humpback whales rolling and then going under water to feed:  Clip #3

Humpback whales

3 humpback whales

Humpback whales resting after a feed

3 humpback whales resting after a feed

humpback whales rolling before going under the water again

2 humpback whales rolling before going under the water again

A humpback whale tail midair is it heads under water

A humpback whale tail midair as it heads under water, another humpback whale rolling, a third whale getting ready to roll

Humpback whale tail

Humpback whale tail

I particularly liked the water coming off this humpbacks tail

I particularly liked the water coming off this humpbacks tail

A humpback blowing water.  They give a really load blow before the roll and head under the water

A humpback blowing water. They give a really load blow before the roll and head under the water

Humpback whales resting

Humpback whales resting & breathing

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4 humpback whales

4 humpback whales

Tom took a couple pics with me in them

Tour guide Tom took a couple pics with me in them

Pic courtesy of tour guide Tom

Pic courtesy of tour guide Tom

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Just as the tail submerges in the the water

Just as the tail submerges in the the water

As the fog lifted the water and sky took on a beautiful blue colour

As the fog lifted the water and sky took on a beautiful blue colour

Watching seals watching us

Watching seals watching us

Jellyfish

Jellyfish

The lighthouse was much more visible on our way back to the dock

The lighthouse was much more visible on our way back to the dock

Fishing farms

Fishing farms

I headed to my motel in Digby where I had some world famous Digby scallops for dinner and called it a day!

The view outside of my room at the Admiral Inn Digby

The view outside of my room at the Admiral Inn Digby

Day 137: August 29 – Bay of Fundy

I didn’t have anything particular planned today other then to get back to Amherst where I would be returning the car first thing tomorrow morning.  So I took my time leaving the hotel.  My first stop was a walk around the town of Digby where they were busy preparing for Wharf Rat Rally – a motorcyclist rally.  I checked out the wharf and saw the huge floating docs.  The Bay of Fundy experiences the highest tide changes in the world at around 50 ft.  The tide changes from high to low and back again every 6hrs 13min.

Digby harbour

Digby harbour

Relative low tide given how low the boats were sitting on the dock

Relative low tide given how low the boats were sitting on the dock

Town of Digby

Town of Digby

They were setting up for a bike rally in town

They were setting up for a bike rally in town

Explanation of why Bay of Fundy has such high tides

Explanation of why Bay of Fundy has such high tides

After checking out Digby I headed East to Annapolis Royal – the oldest settlement in Canada.  This area has experienced a lot of turmoil in the past and claims to be the most fought over land in Canada.  I did a tour around town to look at the old buildings and then walked around Fort Anne.

Some of the old buildings on George St. in Annapolis Royal

Some of the old buildings on George St. in Annapolis Royal

George St

George St

Walking along the boardwalk in Annapolis Royal

Walking along the boardwalk in Annapolis Royal

Enjoying the water view

Enjoying the water view

A tide clock

A tide clock

Evidence that it was close to low tide

Evidence that it was close to low tide

Fort Anne in Annapolis Royal

Fort Anne in Annapolis Royal

Some history of the Fort

Some history of the Fort

 

More history

More history

The main building at the fort

The main building at the fort

Canons and gunpowder room

Canons and gunpowder room

Building at the fort

Building at the fort

Dash walking the halls in at Fort Anne

Dash walking the halls in at Fort Anne

Driving along Annapolis Valley - view to the south

Driving along Annapolis Valley – view to the south

View to the north at the same spot as the pic above - definitely in a valley!

View to the north at the same spot as the pic above – definitely in a valley!

My next stop was South Maitland which is situated along the Shubenacadie River.  I arrived here around 5pm and was told by the kind lady at the information tourist info that the Tidal Bore would happen today in South Maitland at 6:20pm.  I decided to stick around to watch this phenomenon.  So what is a Tidal Bore?  It’s when the incoming tide travels up a river and changes the natural directional flow of the river.  Apparently this can be as little a ripple or as a very visible wave.  Today it was a pretty mild ripple, however it was pretty neat to see just how quickly the tide did come into the river when it started.  While watching this occurrence I chatted with an elderly couple from Ontario who have spent the last 6 weeks road tripping – they had just come form Newfoundland and are now slowly making their way back to Ontario.  While chatting with them about my adventure a group of 3 started asking some questions – they were waiting for their daughters to finish ‘riding the tidal bore’ on a zodiac, they were supposed to be on the venture as well but the one guy broke two toes a couple days ago.  This group was also from Ontario and believe it or not but the one lady was a Schnurr born and raised in Formosa (a small town near my hometown!)  We tried comparing notes on people we might know, but we were just slightly off generation wise so we weren’t having much luck!

Maitland - where the Shubenacadie river meets the bay of fundy

Maitland – where the Shubenacadie river meets the bay of fundy

Dash and I in Maitland

Dash and I in Maitland

South Maitland - I get a sense this park is not used often...

South Maitland – I get a sense this park is not used often…

Pre tidal bore

Pre tidal bore

Mid tidal bore

Mid tidal bore

Mid tidal bore

Mid tidal bore – you can see white whips as the water moves

End of the tidal bore (40 min after the tidal bore started)

End of the tidal bore (40 min after the tidal bore started)

Pre tidal bore

Pre tidal bore

Mid tidal boreAnd 40 min after the tidal bore started

And 40 min after the tidal bore started

 

Mid tidal bore

Riding the bore zodiac coming down the river

Riding the bore zodiac coming down the river

A closer view of the zodiac

A closer view of the zodiac

 

Day 138: August 30 – Amherst

Today was a rest and relax day.  After having breakfast I picked up my bike.  They had moved it from the electrical room to a room that they are holding for upcoming renovations – they felt it would be safer there because it is closed and locked, whereas the electrical room door is left open during the day.  Again – the kindness and consideration of others continues to impress me!

I dropped off the rental car and came back to tighten up the back and front rack on my bike (these were coming loose when I left my bike on Sunday – it wasn’t anything that the hotel folks had done to it).  Unfortunately when I was tightening a nut on the front right rack, the screw it was attached to snapped off!  I must be getting too strong for my own good!  Haha!  I temporarily contemplated heading to a bike store to replace the front rack, or a hardware store to see if I can find a properly fitted U-shapped part to replace it, but decided given how close I am to my destination that I would try a duct tape fix job.  I hope it holds.  I really, really, really hope it holds.  The front rack is still attached by two other screws.  That along with the duct tape should work, right?  I’ll make sure to adjust my gear so the pannier that goes on that rack is lighter in weight.  Please hold duct tape!

Red green would be proud, wouldn't he?

Red green would be proud, wouldn’t he?

Trees, Trees and more Trees

Day 131: August 23 – Miramichi to Bouctouche

Daily Distance = 112.15km, Trip Total = 5,306.33km

Today was a pleasant surprise on the weather front – they were calling for rain until early afternoon and instead I only got a couple quick sprinkles.  Temperature had also cooled off and was a very comfortable low 20’s.

Crossing the bridge in Miramichi - I was happy for the dedicated bike lane!

Crossing the bridge in Miramichi – I was happy for the dedicated bike lane!

Riding along the river in Miramichi

Riding along the river in Miramichi

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A bridge under construction

A bridge under construction

My route today took me mostly south on hwy 11 which sometimes had a nice wide paved shoulder and other times did not.  Overall I found traffic much more inclined to slow down and move over for me than what I was noticing a couple days previously on hwy 8.  As I left Chatham I passed by the airport which had a big banner for the Atlantic Air Show which was going to be held this weekend – darn it!  I was early by 1 day!

This is where the air show is going to be the next day

This is where the air show is going to be the next day

The rough and small shoulder of hwy 11

The rough and small shoulder of hwy 11

Around the 50km mark I was able to pick up rte 134 which was a much less trafficked road.  However it did have one common theme that has been consistent throughout New Brunswick – there are trees everywhere!  I have since been informed that New Brunswick is 85% forest and forestery is the main driving force of the economy.  After riding several days past trees, trees and more trees, I found this stat pretty easy to believe!

Trees, trees, trees

Trees, trees, trees

Me cycling amongst the trees

Me cycling amongst the trees

More acadian flags

More acadian flags

Passing through a quiet town

Passing through a quiet town

As I zipped through Saint-Louis I saw a sign for fresh smoothies – I had to pull over for a quick break.  After savouring my peach, kiwi, banana & raspberry smoothie I was back on the road.

A great spot for a fresh smoothie

A great spot for a fresh smoothie

Hanging out at a park in Richibucto

Hanging out at a park in Richibucto

In Richibucto I made a left hand turn into a Tim Horton’s to use the washroom. This meant I had to make the dreaded left hand turn out of a Tim Horton’s onto a somewhat busy road with no traffic light.  It took several minutes to make the turn safely and I snapped a picture of the lineup of vehicles behind me trying to make this same turn.  How is this for a common pain felt across Canada?!?

The common Timmies car line up

The common Timmies car line up

A skeleton of a sailboat

A skeleton of a sailboat

Passing over hwy 11

Passing over hwy 11

I reached where the campground was supposed to be located on rte 475 around 5:30pm (after going 3km out of my way east of Bouctouche) to find nothing but a sign for the campground indicating it was another 7km away.  This wouldn’t have phased me if the 7km was in the direction I would be heading tomorrow, unfortunately, the 7km was actually heading north.  Pretty much the direction I just came from!  Ugh!

This is where google maps said the campground was supposed to be

This is where google maps said the campground was supposed to be

I decided to pull my bike over and scout out my other options.  A quick call to a pet friendly B&B told me that they were booked for the night, however a pet friendly hotel did still have rooms.  While I was debating what I would do a gentleman came over from across the road and we chatted about my trip.  He told me how impressed he was (in particular he seemed impressed that this trip was done with a dog – he was quick to explain his wife and he are huge animal lovers) and suggested that I use his front yard to camp for the night.  I was a bit hesitant, but he seemed nice enough, a retired fisherman who used to run a 500+ employee fishing company (primarily lobster) and with the promise of a fresh lobster dinner thrown into the mix, I couldn’t refuse the offer.  Half an hour later after my tent was setup and I was getting all my gear organized he came back out with a very apologetic expression.  Apparently his wife came home and she was ‘concerned about how her two cats would handle having a dog on their yard and that I had to go’.  I think I was more disappointed about not getting the promised fresh lobster dinner!  I grudgingly packed up my stuff and headed back into town and checked into the hotel where I was upgraded to a suite and I was quickly asleep!

Day 132: August 24 – Bouctouche to Cap-Pele

Daily Distance = 65.41km, Trip Total = 5,371.74km

After zipping through about 20km of more trees (and the occasional house and farm), I saw Gail and Jim’s car approach me from the opposite direction.  We pulled over into a driveway and got Gail’s bike off the roof rack as she would be joining me for the rest of the day’s ride!  Jim kindly offered to take Dash and my gear in the car for the day so I wouldn’t have to schlep my stuff for the rest of the day! Yay!

Crossing a bridge in Cocagne

Crossing a bridge in Cocagne

Gail once again in the lead!

Gail once again in the lead!

In Shediac we came across a bike rally and decided to stop for a drink and lunch.  We expected service to be a little slow due to all the people in town for the bike rally, but I don’t think either of us expected to wait 40min just to get our water and drinks.  Especially when everybody around us who came in after us already had their food.  And it was definitely not a good sign when around 45min a waitress came out and asked us to repeat our order just so they could ‘confirm they got it right’.  Another 30min later we finally got our food.  The drink was tasty though (or mine was at least!).

Heading out of Shediac and the bike rally

Heading out of Shediac and the bike rally

A quick ride after lunch got us to our campground by the ocean for the night where Jim had already started setting up camp and Gail had both wine and coolers on hand – does it get any better than this?  After dinner (dehydrated food), I took Dash for a walk on the low tide ocean floor and dipped my hand into the pleasantly warm ocean water.  This area is known for having the warmest fresh salt water beaches in Canada.

The beach at our campground in Cap-Pele

The beach at our campground in Cap-Pele

Looking at the warmest fresh salt water in Canada!

Looking at the warmest fresh salt water in Canada!

 

Day 133: August 25 – Cap-Pele to Amherst

Daily Distance = 58.16km, Trip Total = 5,429.90km

I knew today was going to be a relatively short ride day, but I still wanted to get an early start so I could get some errands done in the afternoon.  I was on the road by 9:30, after having said my g’bye’s to Gail and Jim.

Sun rise in Cap-Pele

Sun rise in Cap-Pele

Passed by lots of small fisheries today

Passed by lots of small fisheries today

A fishery

A fishery

An old fishing boat

An old fishing boat

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About 30km into my ride I stopped at a little community hall for a quick break. Shortly after I was stopped three cyclists rolled by.  Originally they were going to keep cycling, but after seeing all my gear they couldn’t resist coming over and chatting.  They were out for a little training spin before they cycle around the Calbot Trail next weekend (apparently it is a supported 3-day ride organized through an Atlantic Canada Cycling group).  As we were talking one of the gents mentioned another cross-Canada female cyclist he met a few weeks ago who had all of her gear stolen in New Brunswick.  I had actually heard of this same story through the gal I had met while camping in Causapscal, QC – it was one of the trio that she had ridden with from Victoria to Quebec.  Needless to say I paid particular attention to my bike and gear while in New Brunswick!

Approaching a very small town

Approaching a very small town

I have found churches to be a good spot to take a break

Dash hanging out by the door hoping somebody will let her in!

Cyclists out for their weekend ride

Cyclists out for their weekend ride

Where does the water end and the sky start?

Where does the water end and the sky start?

More New Brunswick trees

More New Brunswick trees

A couple km’s later I saw a sign indicating I was now in Nova Scotia.  Given that I was on a relatively quiet country road (rte 970 and turning onto rte 366), I wasn’t sure that there would be a sign indicating my crossing of the province, so I was happy there was!  Even better – when I turned around there was a ‘welcome to new brunswick’ sign – this was more than I saw when I actually crossed into New Brunswick so I had to turn around and get a quick picture in front of that sign too.

A proper New Brunswick sign

A proper New Brunswick sign

And on to Nova Scotia!!!

And on to Nova Scotia!!!

These old lobster traps were common at the end of country driveways in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick

These old lobster traps were common at the end of country driveways in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick

Clear sky and quiet road.  Cycling bliss!

Clear sky and quiet road. Cycling bliss!

Nova Scotia like New Brunswick has a lot of trees, but there are actual views (New Brunswick is where I learned the meaning of the expression 'you can't see the forest for the trees')

Nova Scotia like New Brunswick has a lot of trees, but there are actual views (New Brunswick is where I learned the meaning of the expression ‘you can’t see the forest for the trees’)

I liked the clouds

I liked the clouds

Cows!

Cows!

When I made it to the downtown core of Amherst I pulled over for about 15 minutes and listened to a live band that was singing some oldies to a pretty big crowd (or what I assume to be a pretty big crowd for a relatively small town).  I made it to my hotel around 2pm and spent the afternoon hiding from the sun, getting caught up on emails and the blog.

Taking in the band in Amherst

Taking in the band in Amherst

I haven't had a bike shot for a while :)

I haven’t had a bike shot for a while :)

 

The Acadian Route

Note: Nov. 24th – Pictures are now updated!

Day 127: August 19 – Campbellton to Dalhousie

Daily Distance = 25.34, Trip Total = 5,021.91km

After spending a few minutes chatting with some of the hotel staff and Dash adequately begging and receiving a treat, I was on the road for the very short and quick 25km ride to Dalhousie.

This was an enjoyable stretch of quiet road along 134.  I noticed at some point in today’s ride that I haven’t passed a welcome to New Brunswick sign, so instead I took a picture of a road sign ‘NB 134’ – that will have to suffice.

Hello New Brunswick!

Hello New Brunswick!

The most notable part of today’s ride?  Being on a quiet road again and hearing nothing but the whir of my tires as they traverse the paved road.  What a soothing ride.

Dalhousie

Dalhousie

Industry in Dalhousie

Industry on Dalhousie’s waterfront

Not much water access in Dalhousie

Not much water access in Dalhousie

Boat shaped amphitheatre in Dalhousie

Boat shaped amphitheatre in Dalhousie

Dalhousie is a hilly town

Dalhousie is a hilly town

 

Day 128: August 20 – Dalhousie to Bathurst

Daily Distance = 86.14km, Trip Total = 5,108.05km

One of my nightly rituals before a ride day is to take a look at the forecasted weather (temperature, wind direction and velocity) for my current location as well as my anticipated destination for the next day.  It sounds silly, but this helps me visualize and mentally prepare myself for the next day’s ride a bit – will I have a headwind, crosswind or tailwind?  Is the temperature going to be hot – if so I make sure I have an extra bottle of water or two.  If it’s going to rain, then I need my rain gear handy and should wear my contacts instead of glasses.  Last night’s forecast?  A headwind and 40% chance of 1mm of rain (uh-oh – I remember what happened last time that was the forecast).  The headwind proved true.  Rain wise, there was a couple hours of mist in the morning, but then it stopped and just remained as an overcast day – so not too bad.

Between Dalhousie and Charlo

Between Dalhousie and Charlo

Getting ready to take the boat out

Getting ready to take the boat out

This was the coolest stretch of road on today's ride

This was the coolest stretch of road on today’s ride

The majority of my route in New Brunswick will be along the Acadian Coastal Route.  This is a french settled area however everybody I’ve bumped into seems to be bilingual and I am hearing conversations around me in both english and french.  There is definite evidence that I have just missed Acadian Day by a few days (celebrated Aug. 15th) as acadian flags are everywhere!

New Brunswick has a handful of tourist routes to follow.  This is where the appalachian route ends and the acadian coastal route begins

New Brunswick has a handful of tourist routes to follow. This is where the appalachian route ends and the acadian coastal route begins

Canada flag and acadian flag

Canada flag and acadian flag

Town of Charlo

Town of Charlo

Considering that I’m on a coastal route, I’m not always within view of the water – which is actually a blessing today given the headwind, the trees around me provide a bit of shelter!

Some of the rare glimpses of water on today's ride

Some of the rare glimpses of water on today’s ride

Another water view with the all too familiar train tracks

Another water view with the all too familiar train tracks

Normal size churches are seen again in New Brunswick (unlike the grandiose churches found in Quebec)

Normal size churches are seen again in New Brunswick (unlike the grandiose churches found in Quebec)

Most of today's scenery

Most of today’s scenery

This horse kept a close eye on Dash and I!

This horse kept a close eye on Dash and I!

Passing by a log mill

Passing by a log mill

Industrial area just west of Belledune

Industrial area just west of Belledune

Same industrial area

Same industrial area

Belledune

Belledune

A rare glimpse of the water

A rare glimpse of the water

The acadian flag painted on telephone poles through town

The acadian flag painted on telephone poles through town

A first happened on today’s ride and not a particularly pleasant first – I got my first saddle sore.  I’m happy that I’m only experiencing this discomfort near the end of my adventure, but I’m also a bit baffled that it would happen now.  At first I thought this was caused due to the combination of a bumpy road, pushing into the headwind and limited coasting.  But after looking at my saddle tonight I’ve noticed that a tiny little bit of protective leather has chipped out of the saddle – this is screaming for a temporary duct tape repair!

A house in need of renovations

A house in need of renovations

Once settled into the hotel in Bathurst I headed over to the grocery store across the street and picked up a store made salad, a hummus and flatbread snack and a chocolate milk.  Dinner of champions!

 

Day 129: August 21 – Bathurst to Miramichi

Daily Distance = 86.13km, Trip Total = 5,194.18km

Today I was going to be venturing off the acadian coastal route and decided instead to take the more direct route between Bathurst and Miramichi along rte 134 and hwy 8.  It was probably way more hilly than the coastal route as I headed through a rolling forested area and only passed through one town the entire day (a very small town called Alderville), however it was also 100km shorter so it seemed like an easy choice.

Leaving Bathurst

Leaving Bathurst

Rte 134 was a joy to bike on – quiet country paved road.  Hwy 8 wasn’t as pleasant, the paved shoulder was only about 1/2 foot wide and the speed limit was 100.  Cars speeding by wasn’t an issue, but very few of the transports or mack trucks seemed willing to slow down when there was oncoming traffic, so I would usually ditch to the gravel shoulder ’till they passed.  If it weren’t for the head/cross wind, I probably could have held my ground on the limited paved shoulder and there would have been room for all of us, but with the wind my bike drifts a bit (I’m not particularly aerodynamic with 4 panniers a handlbar bag and a trailer), the drifting becomes more of a concern when you factor in the draft created by these bigger vehicles.

Quiet road along rte 134

Quiet road along rte 134

Hwy 8 - one of the few spots that actually had a paved shoulder

Hwy 8 – one of the few spots that actually had a paved shoulder

Some downed trees along why 8

Some downed trees along why 8

This is what the shoulder looked like for most of the ride along hwy 8

This is what the shoulder looked like for most of the ride along hwy 8

Add to the hills and the headwind it was also extremely hot.  On two of my breaks today the locals would eye up my bike and me seating in the shade and mention that it is too ‘chaud’ to be biking!  At 6pm when I was about 7km from my destination I decided to look at what the temperature was – 30 degrees, 37 with the humidex and that was at 6pm!  I’m pretty sure the feels like temperature breached 40 today.  And even though I was going through a forested area, the trees were just a little too far away from the road to provide any shade while riding.

Sooo happy to see this bridge in Miramichi - it meant I was just 7km away from my destination for the day!

Sooo happy to see this bridge in Miramichi – it meant I was just 7km away from my destination for the day!

The three h’s – headwind, hot and hilly.  Remove any one of these three variables (preferably the headwind) and it would have been a pleasant day’s ride.  But all three together made for a tough slog.  You have to be very careful to keep your wits about you on a day like today.  Drink lots of water, eat properly and take breaks when your body needs ’em – first time in a while I’ve needed 3 breaks to push through 85km.  I was VERY happy to get to my hotel tonight and also know that I have a rest day tomorrow!

 

Day 130: August 22 – Miramichi

A rest day!!  After catching up on emails and the blog (much quicker given I can’t get pictures to upload yet! lol!) I headed out for a walk around town.  Miramichi is a cute little town with lots of river side area.  I was quick to find a quiet park near the water, opened up my e-reader and spent about an hour reading by the water.  Ahhhh – this is the life!

Another bridge in Miramichi

Another bridge in Miramichi

Bliss - need I say anymore?

This is bliss – need I say anymore?

Here Comes the Rain

Note: Nov. 23 – Pictures are now updated!

Day 122: August 14 – Riviere-du-Loup to Rimouski

Daily Distance = 112.27, Trip Total = 4,786.34km

This morning I said g’bye to Gail and headed out into the rain at 8am as a solo rider again.  My original stop tonight was going to be a campground at Bic National Park, however Gail’s husband Jim alerted me to the fact that dogs aren’t allowed at the National Parks in Quebec – thanks for the heads up Jim!!  This meant my closest dog friendly accommodation was Rimouski – over 110km away.

The forecast was calling for rain all day and it did not lie.  Today would be my first day on this trip where I had rain for the whole day, so I really can’t complain.  And I still stand by my statement that I will take rain over wind any day!  Around the 25km mark autoroute 20 merged with route 132, which meant I was sharing the road with the big rigs again.  For the first 45km today I also had a headwind, but a reasonably light one so it didn’t hinder me much.  I took my first break around the 45km mark where a group of individuals offered me a picnic lunch and showed genuine concern about me cycling in the rain.  I turned down the lunch only because the temperature was a bit on the cold side (around 10 degrees) and that in combination with the rain meant taking long breaks just led to the body getting cold.  So I quickly chowed down a protein bar and gel, went to the washroom, changed the batteries in my SPOT tracker, let Dash out to do her business and then jumped back on the bike.

Gail took this shot as I left the hotel this morning

Gail took this shot as I left the hotel this morning

Riviere-du-Loup

Riviere-du-Loup

Heading out of Riviere-du-Loup

Heading out of Riviere-du-Loup

The St. Lawrence from just East of Riviere-du-Loup

The St. Lawrence from just East of Riviere-du-Loup

Passing by a field of mustard flowers - the brightest part of my day

Passing by a field of mustard flowers – the brightest part of my day

A train passing through Trois-Pistoles

A train passing through Trois-Pistoles

Sharing the road with the big rigs again :)

Sharing the road with the big rigs again :)

After my break I was happy to find that the wind had changed direction and I now had a slight tailwind.  I would like to comment on the scenery that I passed along the way, but I can only assume it was beautiful.  Due to the misty/foggy/rainy haze I was only able to see anywhere from 100-500 metres ahead of me at a time.  Even though visibility was reduced I still felt safe on the road due to the wide paved shoulder and all my fluorescent gear must be doing it’s job because vehicles were giving me a wide berth.

A soggy water view

A soggy water view

The edges of Bic National Park

The edges of Bic National Park

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Still around the area of Pic National Park

Still around the area of Pic National Park

Skirting around Pic National Park

A valley skirting around Pic National Park

I was able to cover the full 112km today with only taking two short breaks.  I have been noticing over the past couple weeks that my body needs fewer and fewer breaks (and food) during the day while riding, water I always have on hand.  I generally still take the breaks when I come across a convenient location, simply ‘cuz I want to take in the scenery around me, however it’s pretty cool to see how the body adopts and improves over time and on a day like today it was mighty convenient to not necessarily need the breaks.

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Getting closer to my destination for the night - Rimouski!

Getting closer to my destination for the night – Rimouski!

Looking back at some of the climbs today

Looking back at some of the climbs today

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What are becoming some of my favourite things - a waterfall, a stream and train tracks

What are becoming some of my favourite things – a waterfall, a stream and train tracks

What luck?  These guys were going my pace!

What luck? These guys were going my pace!

Day 123: August 15 – Rimouski to Sainte-Flavie

Daily Distance = 30.95km, Trip Total = 4,817.29km

Because of the longer distance covered yesterday I opted to make today a shorter day.  And given the choice to spend the evening on the river or inland, I opted to spend one last night on the St. Lawrence river.  So my destination was Sainte-Flavie, I tiny little town on route 132 just before I would start heading inland.  The ride itself was pretty quick, only a couple hours to cover 30km going through several little coastal towns.  The biggest thing I noticed was the very, very distinct smell of salt water coming from the river – it smelt like I was already at the ocean and given that I could barely make out the sight of land on the other side of the river it had an ocean feel too.  Almost hard to believe that I am so close to the Atlantic!!

Dedicated promenade bike lane in Rimouski

Dedicated promenade bike lane in Rimouski

Watching a kite surfer with a scenic backdrop

Watching a kite surfer with a scenic backdrop

I had to zoom my camera as far as it would go to see the boats and ocean liner in the river

I had to zoom my camera as far as it would go to see the boats and ocean liner in the river

A lighthouse and submarine

A lighthouse and submarine

Close up of the submarine

Close up of the submarine

What most of my short ride looked like today

What most of my short ride looked like today

Bright coloured coastal houses

Bright coloured coastal houses

I arrived in Sainte-Flavie around 2pm and had a pleasant afternoon strolling along the beach and rocks and starring at the water as the tide came in.  Such a wonderfully relaxing afternoon.  Gail and I have noticed the tide influence on the river since our campground in Montmagny.  It seems like such a weird concept to me for a river to have a tide.

Dash checking out the view from our motel in Sainte-Flavie

Dash checking out the view from our motel in Sainte-Flavie

Taking a walk along the tidal bed

Taking a walk along the tidal bed

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Sainte-Flavie

Sainte-Flavie

Sainte-Flavie

Sainte-Flavie

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Watching the sunset in Sainte-Flavie

Watching the sunset in Sainte-Flavie

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Day 124: August 16 – Sainte-Flavie to Causapscal

Daily Distance = 95.58km, Trip Total = 4,912.87km

Today I felt strong.

How can you not feel good waking up to this view?

How can you not feel good waking up to this view?

Today I spent about 25 of the first 30km climbing, sometimes gradually, sometimes not so gradually and still I felt strong.

Not only was I climbing, but this herd of sheep were too

Not only was I climbing, but this herd of sheep were too

My last view of the St. Lawrence heading out of Sainte-Flavie and en route to Mont-Joli

My last view of the St. Lawrence heading out of Sainte-Flavie and en route to Mont-Joli

 

Lots of climbing today

Lots of climbing today

Hanging out on a quiet river

Hanging out on a quiet river

More climbing

More climbing

Looking back at some of the climbing

Looking back at some of the climb

A small town along route 132

A small town along route 132

The town of Sayabec and Lac Metapedia

The town of Sayabec and Lake Matapedia

On the outskirts of Sayabec

On the outskirts of Sayabec

Lake Matapedia

Lake Matapedia

Lake Matapedia

Lake Matapedia

Heading out of Sayabec

Heading out of Sayabec

The flattest land I saw today

The flattest land I saw today

These signs pop up every 10 or 15km in Quebec

These signs pop up every 10 or 15km in Quebec

 

Following the green route

Following the green route

Lake Matapedia

Lake Matapedia

Today as I approached Amqui (around the 70km mark) I looked at the skies ahead and saw that the 40% chance of less than 1mm of rain being forecasted was probably going to be closer to 100% chance of 10mm of rain, but it didn’t matter because I was still feeling strong.  I could have stopped in Amqui and missed riding in most of the rain, but I had so much energy I wanted to keep going.  Rain or not.  I did however take the chance to stop at the Subway in Amqui and have a sub thinking it might kill a bit of time as the worst of the rain passed.  As I sat on the front step outside of subway eating my sub a gentleman came by and started doing a thorough inspection of my bike.  No big deal, I’m used to the stares and the inspections, but when he started touching the handlebar bag and shaking my rear ortlieb panniers a line was crossed.  Especially considering that rear ortlieb pannier is attached to my back rack which does have that slightly loosening and shaved screw.  So I called out to him ‘can I help you?’.  He seemed slightly surprised this contraption was mine, but was quick to tell me about the time he cycled from Portland to San Diego and told me that he was just ‘testing’ how well my ortlieb pannier fit to the back rack.  Apparently my setup passed the test but I did kindly ask him to stop ‘testing’ my stuff as I still needed it to get me through the rest of this great country.

Amqui and a sudden downpour of rain

Amqui and a sudden downpour of rain

After letting the worst of the rain pass, I got back on my bike – and still I was feeling strong.  I flew the last 25km to Causapscal, the last 5km or so in the rain again.  Due to the rain I was going to try to find a motel, but the one I stumbled upon seemed to be booked up so instead I headed to the campground.  I must have spent about 30 minutes warming up in the shower and contemplating this surge of energy I have experienced today.  I have always been the kind of cyclist who prefers flat land.  I never quite understood those who said they like the challenge of the hills.  But today I got it.  The sense of accomplishment when you tackle a hill and still have energy to go for another 50+km is exhilarating!  Plus, there is more to keep you captivated on the scenery front when you don’t know what’s waiting for you at the top of the next hill or around the next bend.

Following La Route Verte 1 off the beaten path

Following La Route Verte 1 off the beaten path

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Between Amqui and Causapscal

Between Amqui and Causapscal

Crossing the river to get back to Route 132

Crossing the river to get back to Route 132

While letting dinner cook away I took Dash for a walk in the non-service area of the campground and saw another lightweight tent (albeit big – 3 or 4 person).  However I saw no sign of a car or bike.  As I turned around and headed back to my site I bumped into a fellow cyclist!  Ashleigh is the owner of the other tent, she had gotten in earlier and went into town to eat and pick up a couple beers which she kindly shared with me.  She is also cycling across Canada, she had started with two other gal friends on April 28th (around the same time as me).  So all the times through the prairies when I was being asked if I was ‘with those three girls’ – it may just have been her group that was being referred to (and here I was thinking it had to have been the Friends with Fenders ladies).  Anyway – Ashleigh spent a month in Quebec doing a french immersion program, so her trio ended up finding their own paths for the east coast.  She is hoping to get to Halifax by next Fri. to meet up with one of the trio (she’ll be doing much longer distance days than my relaxed pace!).  We spent a couple hours swapping stories, commiserating over the brutal prairie winds, seeing if we’ve bumped into any of the same cross-canadian cyclists, etc.

Today I went to sleep still feeling strong!

 

Day 125: August 17 – Causapscal to Campbellton

Daily Distance = 83.70km, Trip Total = 4,996.57km

I was really looking forward to today’s ride.  After pulling away from the St. Lawrence yesterday and climbing a bit to Lac Matapedia, today I was going to be enjoying a liesurely route following the Matapedia river back down to sea level in Campbellton.  I wasn’t disappointed.  Although there were a couple slight climbs, for the most part it was a gradual descent.  Along the way I saw several folks in the river fishing for salmon, apparently there are only specific locations where folks can fish, these are well signed along the way.  At more than one point I thought how cool it would have been to have a raft and just float my way (with gear) the 80km to Campbellton – and not because I didn’t want to be on the bike, just because I think it would have been a fun way to spend the day!

Near Causapscal

Near Causapscal

Causapscal

Causapscal

Passing by a logging company outside of Causapscal

Passing by a logging company outside of Causapscal

A monument to everyday workers

A monument to everyday workers

Old wooden covered tunnel

Old wooden covered tunnel

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Once again on the small country road

Once again on the small country road

A very typical view for the day - road with trees on one side and Matapedia river on the other

A very typical view for the day – road with trees on one side and Matapedia river on the other

Salmon fisher

Salmon fisher

The scenery was also quite stunning as I was passing through the northern reaches of the appalachian mountain range.  I’ll let the pictures do the explaining when I’m able to get them posted!

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A group of rafters enjoying a lazy river ride

A group of rafters enjoying a lazy river ride

Canoes with motors

Canoes with motors

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Lots of people on Matapedia river

Lots of people on Matapedia river

Campbellton and Sugarloaf Provincial park

Campbellton and Sugarloaf Provincial park

I continued along 132 until Pointe-a-la-Croix where I took the bridge over to Campbellton, New Brunswick – another province bites the dust!  And another time zone change.  My hotel is located right beside the bridge, so it was really easy to find.  After getting settled in and airing out my tent, washing my clothes, etc I headed out for a quick walk to check out the town.  I was immediately drawn to the wharf where I enjoyed an ice cream and a shrimp club sandwich in that order.  You know you’re in the maritimes when shrimp and lobster are standard food fare!

The bridge heading to Campbellton (connecting Quebec and New Brunswick)

The bridge heading to Campbellton (connecting Quebec and New Brunswick)

Shrimp club sandwich

Shrimp club sandwich

Walking along the promenade in Campbellton

Walking along the promenade in Campbellton

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Fishing for salmon

Fishing for salmon

Another salmon statue in Campbellton

Another salmon statue in Campbellton

 

Day 126: August 18 – Campbellton

I enjoyed an R&R day where I caught up on my blog and went for an 8km walk around Sugarloaf Provincial Park.  It was good to get on some walking trails where I could let Dash walk off leash for a while and explore.  Although I think the heat (29 degrees) got to her a bit, around the 6km mark she plopped herself on the ground near a gas station so I sat down beside her and poured some water into the left over fruit smoothie cup I had from timmies for her to drink out of.  After the past 4 or 5 days being so cool in temperature I wasn’t expecting summer like conditions to come back – hopefully they’ll stick around for more than just the day!

Walking through Sugarloaf Provincial Park

Walking through Sugarloaf Provincial Park

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Sugarloaf Provincial Park - my hike for the day

Sugarloaf Provincial Park – my hike for the day

Stopping for a much needed water break

Stopping for a much needed water break

Two is Better

Day 119: Aug 11 – Quebec City to Montmagny

Daily Distance = 64.39km, Trip Total = 4,537.49km

I woke up at 7am this morning not particularly rested, I’ve had a couple late nights researching a change to my intended route and booking some accommodations on the East Coast.  My choice to bring Dash on the trip certainly does add to the amount of planning I have to do, but I don’t regret the decision for a minute.  Regardless – I should have given myself one more day in Quebec City to research, rest and explore the city.  Oh well – the show must go on!  And for the next few days I have a new partner in crime as Gail flew into Quebec City last night and will be riding with me for a few days!

Schwabe Marathon tire after 1,600km of wear - only the middle tread left and green dots starting to show through the rubber

Schwalbe Marathon tire after 1,600km of wear – only the middle tread left and green dots starting to show through the rubber – in particular on the left side which is the side Dash’s trailer hitches to

We were able to roll out of the hotel around 9am and headed along the dedicated bike paths to old Quebec where we picked up a ferry over to Levis.  One of the workers on the ferry tried to get Dash to play with a rope but Dash was too distracted with all the new sounds around her to take much interest.

One last view of fort Quebec from the ferry terminal

One last view of fort Quebec from the ferry terminal

Well marked bike paths in Quebec

Well marked bike paths in Quebec

My bike waiting for the ferry to Levis

My bike waiting for the ferry to Levis

Gail stabilizing her bike.  The ferry actually had bike racks!!

Gail stabilizing her bike on the ferry to Levis. The ferry actually had bike racks!!

View of Chateau Frontenac from the ferry

View of Chateau Frontenac from the ferry

We were greeted in Levis with an easy to find trail that gradually climbed out of town.  After putting Dash back in the trailer after a quick washroom break a lady walked by with a dog.  Unfortunately Dash did not respond particularly well and actually ripped through her mesh screen door.  After calming Dash down Gail and I were able to finagle a temporary duct tape repair job on the trailer.  At this same rest area we had a conversation with a local cyclist who was quite impressed that I am cycling with a dog – Dash’s popularity across the country continues to grow!

For the most part the ride was pretty uneventful, we always had a dedicated trail or nice wide paved shoulder to safely travel on.  Gail led the way for the first 45km – I didn’t even try to keep pace, just stuck with my slow and steady mantra.  I completely expected my last four months on the road to make me a quicker cyclist even though I’m hauling a bit more gear than Gail, but this was certainly not the case!  Around the 45km mark, the pace started to wane slightly so we pulled over for a few breaks in the last 20km and to get fuel in the way of food.

Bike trails out of Levis

Bike trails out of Levis

Who is that riding behind me?

Who is that riding behind me?

And now strategically placed behind the flag...

And now strategically placed behind the flag…

It's GAIL!!!

It’s GAIL!!!

Taking in some of the farmland on Ile de Orleans

Taking in some of the farmland on Ile de Orleans

This is what most of the day looked like - Gail always 100 metres ahead!

This is what most of the day looked like – Gail always 100 metres ahead!

Passing by a classic car show

Passing by a classic car show

Once arriving at the campground we started the process of setting up camp and were greeted with a couple quick rain showers and a rainbow too – unfortunately I was too slow to get a good picture of the rainbow.

Watching the sunset from our campground in Montmagny

Watching the sunset from our campground in Montmagny

We could see the occasional bands of rain approaching from across the river

We could see the occasional bands of rain approaching from across the river

 

Note: Nov. 23 – Pictures are now updated!

Day 120: August 12 – Montmagny to Riviere-Ouelle

Daily Distance = 74.32km, Trip Total = 4,611.81

As we were riding this morning I mentioned to Gail that I would like to stop at a fruit stand for some blueberries.  The fruit stands are not near as abundant in this stretch as they were between Montreal and Quebec City and I had previously only stopped for strawberries and raspberries.  So just over an hour into the ride when we both spotted a fruit stand on our right advertising blueberries, it was a no-brainer to pull in.  As I parked my bike I heard Gail mutter ‘oh shit’ from behind me and then heard the sound of a fall.  I immediately turned around to see Gail and the bike on the ground with Gail quickly assuring me she was ok.  Apparently Gail has become too efficient with her new clips and when she came to the stop she clipped out and then accidentally clipped back in.  Shortly after the fall she noticed her arm was swollen so she took a seat at the picnic table and I tried to ask the gentleman working the fruit stand for some ice.  Unfortunately he spoke no english and although I tried miming an action for ice and repeated the word ‘glace’ (the word I’m sure I have seen printed on ice machines) he wasn’t understanding me.  Fortunately he went over to the house and came back with his granddaughter (I’m assuming his granddaughter) who did speak english and was able to translate for us.  She was very quick to bring out ice wrapped in a cloth as well as a frozen bottle of water so that we would have ice while on the road – so thoughtful!  After all this was said and done, I purchased what had to be the best tasting blueberries I have ever had.

The after effects of using clips

The after effects of using clips

 

Another small Quebec town, another impressive church

Another small Quebec town, another impressive church

Couldn't resist pulling over for a picture of this waterfall

Couldn’t resist pulling over for a picture of this waterfall

Evidence of the tide is become more obvious as we head up the St. Lawrence

Evidence of the tide is become more obvious as we head up the St. Lawrence

P1040007

Back on the road we were on 132 just about to head into a very small town called Saint-Roch-des-Aulnaies when we saw the signs of construction ahead of us.  As we approached the flag man we asked if we could travel on the road, he told us no, that we would have to take the 10km detour with the cars.  We tried to persuade him to let us go through, explaining that a 10km detour is a long way for us to travel.  Eventually he radioed another worker, we could tell he was talking about us with a handful of words ‘deux madame’, ‘pannier’, ‘bicyclette’, etc., once off the radio he told us nope, the route was just too rough.  I tried to persuade him that we were ok with a rough route but he wasn’t having anything of it.  So, Gail suggested we pull ahead a little bit and re-group.  There was a municipal building a couple 100 metres ahead, so we parked our bikes there.  While I was pouting and strategizing how to convince Gail to go through the closed road we noticed two cyclists coming from the other direction through the closed road (with panniers – so they likely weren’t locals).  My mind was set – no 10km detour for me!  I asked Gail how she felt about ignoring the flag man and just going through the construction site.  There was a bit of hesitation, but while discussing we saw yet another cyclist go through from the direction we were trying to go through.  That sealed the deal. We quickly got on our bikes and headed back to the closed road barrier.  As soon as we turned on to the closed road Gail quickly passed me saying ‘they’re yelling at us, should we stop?’ as she quickly pedalled on.  I glanced behind me where I could now hear the flag man yelling at us, but he wasn’t giving chase so I figured it was best to just keep moving forward.  For the first while the road wasn’t bad at all, we could still ride, just slowly.  Then we came to a section where the whole road was torn up.  We had to get off our bikes and walk – still better than a 10km detour.  Then we got to a section where they were actively working with several mack trucks and we felt it was too dangerous to pass on the road, so we started eyeing up a couple houses front yards on our left.  Gail made eye contact with the seniors sitting on their front porches and mimed permission for us to pass through their yards, both couples immediately waved their approval.  So we rolled our bikes through a couple yards, over a downed tree log (this required 4 hands to get my bike and trailer over, Gail was quick to offer a helping hand), through small brush and back on to the dug up road (but past the point where the mack trucks were working).  As we were cutting through front yards, two more touring cyclists passed us – they apparently did not have our reservation about cycling so closely to the mack trucks.  We had about another km before the construction zone ended, but it was ridable road again.  All in all, MUCH better than a 10km detour!

A road under construction

A road under construction

Some yards we detoured through

Some yards we detoured through

This log would have been mighty hard to haul all my gear over alone - thank you Gail for the hand!!

This log would have been mighty hard to haul all my gear over alone – thank you Gail for the hand!!

Out of construction and on to a trail!

Out of construction and on to a trail!

Gail and I

Gail and I

While setting up camp I went to have a shower while Gail kindly watched Dash for me (it’s quite nice having somebody else around so I don’t have to muzzle and leave Dash her in the tent while I shower or go to the washroom).  When I came back from the shower Gail let Dash off leash as she saw me (we had a pretty wide non-service area to ourselves, so there was lots of freedom for Dash).  Dash quickly ran towards me and then started playing her game of running in circles, however instead of running in a circle she bolted for Gail’s tent and tried to leap in.  Unbeknownst to Dash the door was zipped closed so she instead made direct impact with the mesh door and bounced back.  She quickly shook herself off while I busted a gut laughing.  The tent was unharmed, thankfully!  I wish I could have gotten that on video!

Setting up camp

Setting up camp

I look very sunburned compared to Gail, don't I?

I look sunburned compared to Gail, don’t I?

Our campground store was pretty well stocked, so we enjoyed a nice white wine over our dehydrated dinner and called it an early night.

Gail and I getting our drink on (wine and water!)

Gail and I getting our drink on (wine and water!)

Gail in front of the sunset

Gail in front of the sunset

My favourite kind of campground - on the water!

My favourite kind of campground – on the water!

Sun setting on the St. Lawrence

Sun setting on the St. Lawrence

Day 121: August 13 – Riviere-Ouelle to Riviere-du-Loup

Daily Distance = 62.26km, Trip Total = 4,674.07km

We were really aiming to get on the road by 9am this morning as we had a short day today, a hotel to look forward to tonight, a long ride tomorrow and rain was going to start today and get increasingly stronger throughout the day. Even though we were up nice and early (before 7am), for some reason we seemed unable to get on the road until about 9:45am.

We headed out into a decent headwind (not prairie strength, but enough to slow our speeds down a bit).  In the morning we just had light sprinkles, but by about noon it was raining more consistently and by 2pm it was starting to get uncomfortable mostly because the temperatures were also cooler than normal (around 12-15 degrees).  Just before noon we came through a town called Kamouraska and stopped at the tourist info to take a quick break and use the washrooms.  While here we bumped into 3 other cyclists and swapped the normal stories.  From here and for the rest of the day we took only short breaks.  With the rain and the cooler climate it was uncomfortable to take breaks of any length ‘cuz the body would start getting cold.

Riviere-Ouelle

Riviere-Ouelle

Farmland

Farmland

Rain jacket was a necessity today

Rain jacket was a necessity today

It looks like those hills are getting closer and closer...

It looks like those hills are getting closer and closer…

A house in Kamouraska

A house in Kamouraska

A rainy view of the St. Lawrence

A rainy view of the St. Lawrence

A picture of me!  And NOT a selfy!!

A picture of me! And NOT a selfy!!

Rock cut away

Rock cut away (I wasn’t quite tall enough to see over the road barrier)

 

Crossing over route 20

Crossing over route 20

 

If not singing in the rain, at least smiling in the rain

If not singing in the rain, at least smiling in the rain

We arrived in Riviere-du-Loup around 4pm.  A warm shower never felt so good!  After getting cleaned up we ordered room service.  I was starving so actually ordered two meals – a dinner size salad and a club sandwhich with mashed potatoes.  Gail restrained herself and just had one meal.  After dinner I headed to the hot tub with my book and we were out for the night by 11pm.

Dash tuckered out after a windy, rainy ride

Dash tuckered out after a windy, rainy ride

Quebec City

Day 117 & 118: August 9 & 10 – Quebec City

I spent two rest days in Quebec City.  The first day was spent updating the blog and then doing some more detailed research on the next leg of the trip.  I’ve decided to modify my originally planned route a bit, so this meant I had to dig up some information on campgrounds and pet-friendly hotels along the new route.

The second day I spent a few hours walking around old Quebec and taking in the sights.  This is definitely a city I wouldn’t mind coming back to!  Unfortunately I couldn’t spend the whole day meandering, I had some serious supplies to re-stock and both the MEC and cycle shop that I needed to drop by closed at 5pm on Sat. so I had to pull myself away from old Quebec to do my errands.  What did I have to re-stock?  At MEC I picked up my next 2wks worth of dehydrated food, protein bars, energy jubes and propane.  At the bike shop I had to pick up a new tire.  My rear tire has once again worn through the tread and although I think there is still some life left in it, I don’t think there’s quite enough to get me to the next significant city where I could get a decent replacement.  In Sauble Beach I had switched my rear tire from Continental Touring Plus to Schwalbe Marathon.  My research indicated that these two tires are the two top of the line touring tires, but that the Schwalbe has a much longer life span before the tread wears.  I was assured that the Schwalbe would see me through the rest of the country, but given that I’m starting to see the green under the tread (especially on the left side, which is the side of the bike that the trailer hitches to), I think it best to replace the tire now.  The Schwalbe  has gotten me about 1,600km whereas the Continentals were only getting me through about 1,000km, so it is certainly an improvement.

Now here are some pics from my walk around the city today:

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Walking on the fort walls in Quebec

Walking on the fort walls in Quebec

View from Old Quebec

View from Old Quebec

Me in Old Quebec

Me in Old Quebec

Dash on the walls in Old Quebec

Dash on the walls in Old Quebec

Dash and I overlooking Old Quebec

Dash and I overlooking Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

 

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Buskers in Old Quebec

Buskers in Old Quebec

Horse drawn carriage

Horse drawn carriage

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Park overlooking the river

Park overlooking the river

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Samuel de Champlain statue

Samuel de Champlain statue

 

Overlooking the river

Overlooking the river

Looking across to Levis

Looking across to Levis

Me!

Me!

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Fountain in Old Quebec

Fountain in Old Quebec

Old Quebec

Old Quebec

I think this fire hydrant has the best view in the city

I think this fire hydrant has the best view in the city

View from Old Quebec

View from Old Quebec

Church - I like the gold statue

Church – I liked the gold statue

Fruit Stand Alley

Day 113: August 5 – Montreal to Berthierville

Daily Distance = 78.37, Trip Total = 4,265.58km

I wanted to get on the road at a decent hour this morning so I set my alarm for 8am.  After having a muffin at the continental breakfast I quickly began the process of re-assembling Dash’s trailer and hauling all of my gear up the couple stairs to the back door of the hotel.  I was able to get everything re-assembled and all my gear loaded on my bike by shortly after 10am.  Because there is a park across the street from the hotel I decided to let Dash run around for a bit before putting her in the trailer and hitting the road.  After playing in the park, I went back to my bike and turned on my GPS.  Except it wouldn’t turn on!  My bike GPS is what shows me my current speed, distance travelled, distance to destination, where the next turn is, what the distance to the next turn is, etc.  Granted – this is not necessary info when riding a bike, but I’ve become hooked to the data generated on a ride (in particular speed and distance travelled).  I pulled out the external battery pack (HyperJuice) and plugged the GPS into it.  Fortunately when plugged into the external power source the GPS worked.  So as a temporary solution I left the GPS plugged into the external power source while I rode (this wouldn’t have been a viable option if raining, so thankfully it was a clear day!).

The silver box is an external power source (HyperJuice) which is plugged into my bike GPS - hopefully this is a temporary solution 'cuz it won't fair well in rainy conditions

The silver box is an external power source (HyperJuice) which is plugged into my bike GPS – hopefully this is a temporary solution ‘cuz it won’t fair well in rainy conditions

With that hiccup temporarily averted I was finally ready to start the trek out of Montreal.  I have to applaud the ‘bike’ option on Google Maps.  Every night I look up the next days ride on Google Maps and select the bike option.  This will show any known trails in the area which is extremely helpful when manoeuvring around new cities.  Through Google Maps I saw that there is a trail that runs along Notre Dame out of the city.  This trail was pretty easy to find and with the help of the ‘Route Verte’ signs it was pretty easy to follow once on the trail.

Molson plant leaving Montreal

Molson plant leaving Montreal

Following the industrial route out of Montreal

Following the industrial route out of Montreal

A picture with flowers

A picture with flowers

Once out of Montreal the terrain was incredibly flat, the St. Lawrence to my right, the starting of farmland to the left and a nice paved shoulder.  All in all, an enjoyable ride.

A windmill along route 138

A windmill along route 138

A dog on a bike?  I just HAD to take a picture of this!

A dog on a bike? I just HAD to take a picture of this!

Following some of the trails through the smaller towns on the outskirts of Montreal

Following some of the trails through the smaller towns on the outskirts of Montreal

I can safely say I'm not speeding!

At 15km/hr I can safely say I’m not speeding!

Crossing out of Montreal Island

Crossing out of Montreal Island

In Lavaltrie I took a break at a picnic area and had a quick chat with a couple who asked the standard questions about my trip (they were quick to switch to English when I told them I didn’t speak French).  This has become my new first sentence to anybody ‘sorry, I don’t speak French’.  At that point they either convert to English or smile and walk away.  Either response works for me.  So far I haven’t received any rude responses at my inability to speak the local language.

In Lavaltrie we watched a mack truck begin a journey up river

In Lavaltrie we watched a mack truck begin a journey up river

Same truck just a dot on the St. Lawrence

Same truck just a dot on the St. Lawrence

In Lanoraie I took another break and quickly noticed that a screw in one of my panniers had come out.  Fortunately both the screw and nut where found inside the pannier so it was a pretty easy fix.  I decided to do a more thorough scan of my bike (something I do about once a week on the trip, aside from the wheels which I check every day) and found that a screw that secures the back rack is also coming loose.  This screw has come loose a couple times on the trip and I fear the screw is getting stripped a bit.  I’ll keep a closer eye on this and might have to make a stop at a hardware store to replace the screw sooner rather than later.

My view for most of the day (once out of Montreal suburbs)

My view for most of the day (once out of Montreal suburbs)

Gear all fixed up again in Lanoraie

Gear all fixed up again in Lanoraie

Church in Lavoraie

Church in Lavoraie

Scenery between Lanoraie and Berthierville

Scenery between Lanoraie and Berthierville

My original destination tonight was supposed to be a campground in Lanoraie, however in my more thorough research while in Montreal I was able to find a pet friendly hotel in Berthierville that had a room for just $69 including breakfast.  This was not a hard decision to make and I certainly wasn’t disappointed.  The Days Inn in Berthierville immediately greets you with a ‘beinvenue cyclists’ sign and an outdoor, roofed bike area.  Although they also let you bring the bike into the room (which is the option I chose).

Welcome cyclists sign at Days Inn in Berthierville

Welcome cyclists sign at Days Inn in Berthierville

Bike shelter

Bike shelter

In more good news, my GPS around the 70km mark today informed me that it was no longer using the external power source and was actually powering itself.  I still emailed the folks at Garmin to ask their advice and they were super quick about giving me a response with a couple of options to try to resolve the issue, acknowledging that this isn’t normal behaviour.

Once settled into the hotel I headed over to a grocery store and picked up some veggies for tomorrow’s ride as well as a garden salad with chicken from St. Hubert’s.  For the first time in my life I can say I’m actually craving vegetables!

Day 114: August 6 – Berthierville to Trois-Riviere

Daily Distance = 63.57km, Trip Total = 4,329.15km

Tuesday August 6th, 8pm.  Slow motion thought to myself: “Oh shit – that’s a train coming towards me.”

Now rewind 11hrs to see how we got here:

I woke up at 9 after a very restful sleep and enjoyed the standard fair at the continental breakfast.  Shortly before 11am I was on the road, following route 138.  I passed an abundance of farmland, fruit & vegetable stands, and cyclists (actually most of the cyclists passed me vs me passing them).  I cycled through a road under construction where I laughed as a construction worker gave the international thumbs up hitchhiker sign.  I stopped in front of a grocery store in Louiseville where I met a couple from France who were spending 14 days cycling Quebec.  I enjoyed the vegetables I had bought the previous night.  Just west of my destination for the night (Trois-Riviere) I stopped at a park and savoured some gelato.  I checked into my hotel for the night.  I did the normal nightly routine – unpack, shower, hunt out food.

It was while I was seeking out food (perhaps a little less alert than normal given my food for the day has consisted of a bagel, two handfuls of veggies and an apple), walking along a road with the edges of the city to my right and nothing but a road, industrial buildings and the St. Lawrence to my left.  When I noticed something moving in my peripheral vision to the right.  Thinking nothing of it, I then glanced straight down and mildly noticed I was walking on train tracks.  That’s when I looked more closely at the moving object to my right and noticed ‘Oh shit – that’s a train coming towards me’!  I immediately ran off the tracks.  Turns out I was in no real danger – the train actually stopped well before the sidewalk and road, somebody hopped off the train to watch for a relative break in traffic before they turned on the train signals and slowly backed the train along the tracks across the road and into one of the industrial plants by the river.  Still – it certainly did wake me up and got the heart pumping!

I didn't backtrack to the exact location of the train tracks - but this is what the road looked like about 200 metres east of the tracks

I didn’t backtrack to the exact location of the train tracks – but this is what the road looked like about 200 metres east of the tracks

And now pictures from the day:

Outside Gilles Villeneuve museum in Berthierville

Outside Gilles Villeneuve museum in Berthierville

Farmland

Farmland

Crossing autoroute 40

Crossing autoroute 40

More farmland with flat land and not so flat land in the distance

More farmland with flat land and not so flat land in the distance

Crossing road construction

Crossing road construction

This road construction went on for many km's - thankfully I didn't have to detour!

This road construction went on for many km’s – thankfully I didn’t have to detour!

Louiseville where I met the couple from France touring Quebec

Louiseville where I met the couple from France touring Quebec

Lots of beautiful designed churches along the way

Lots of churches along the way

More farmland

More farmland

There were a row of about 10 houses all in the same style and colour

There were a row of about 10 houses all in the same style and colour

A serene view just west of Trois-Riviere

A serene view just west of Trois-Riviere

Park just west of Trois-Riviere

Park just west of Trois-Riviere

Enjoying some gelato

Enjoying some gelato

Bike paths are great - but not so great on garbage day...

Bike paths are great – but not so great on garbage day…

 

Day 115: August 7 – Trois-Riviere to Portneuf

Daily Distance = 73.84km, Trip Total = 4,402.99km

Today’s route (still on 138) brought me back along the waters edge for most of the day and about every 10′ (or what felt like about 10′) there is either a fruit & veggie stand, an ice cream stand or a poutine stand.  Let’s just say cyclists in this area should not go hungry during the summer months!  I’m not a gravy fan, so I wasn’t lured in by any of the poutine stands but I did stop for fresh raspberries!  Yum!

Relatively early in the morning a cyclist on his road bike passed me giving me a gigantic air fist pump.  Not too long after this a motorcyclist passed me honking his horn and then giving me a thumbs up (in case I didn’t hear the horn).  This really never gets old :)

Trois-Riviere

Trois-Riviere

Crossing bridge in Trois-Riviere

Crossing bridge in Trois-Riviere

It's not abnormal to see a group of cyclists such as this one along the paths in Quebec

It’s not abnormal to see a group of cyclists such as this one along the paths in Quebec

Watching the boats go by just outside of Champlain

Watching the boats go by just outside of Champlain

One of the many, many, many fruit stands along the way :)

One of the many, many, many fruit stands along the way :)

Typical view for the day

Typical view for the day

I liked the timer count down from when the light turns red to green in the upper right hand corner

I liked the timer count down from when the light turns red to green in the upper right hand corner

I opted for the sidewalk because the metal grate bridge does not bode well for a loaded up bike

I opted for the sidewalk because the metal grate bridge does not bode well for a loaded up bike

Crossing the bridge

Crossing the bridge

A 90 degree turn on the bridge?  Ugh - not so easy with the trailer...

A 90 degree turn on the bridge? Ugh – not so easy with the trailer…

But after a bit of jostling I was able to get through

But after a bit of jostling I was able to get through

Farmland!

Farmland!

This church was a pretty impressive view as you see it as you cross a bridge into the town of Sainte-Anne-de-la-Perade

This church was a pretty impressive view – you see it as you cross a bridge into the town of Sainte-Anne-de-la-Perade

Fruit stand

Fruit stand

About 20km from my destination for the night, I started to glimpse a dot in my rear view mirror.  And not just the dot of another cyclist, but another cyclist on a tour!  The panniers are what makes this an easy distinction to make.  Joe is also cycling across Canada, although much speedier than I!  He started his travels in early June and is expecting to be done in about 10 more days (final destination is Halifax).  He was kind enough to slow down his speed for me and we spent the next 20km of road swapping stories of our journey so far.  It was great to have company from a fellow tourer.  At the turnoff to my campground he continued along his path to Quebec City (my end point for the day was about his halfway point!  Crazy!)

A fellow cross Canada tourer - Joe

A fellow cross Canada tourer – Joe

Across the St. Lawrence

Across the St. Lawrence

View from the entrance to my campground for the night

View from the entrance to my campground for the night

While setting up camp I very, very distinctly wished that I had a couch to sit down on and put my feet up.  So far the camping has gone better than I expected, but I have to admit, I’m growing tired of setting up camp, taking camp down and sleeping on the ground.  From here on out, I will be treating myself to a hotel if there is a pet friendly one in my vicinity.  These will not be so easily found in rural Quebec, but when I get close to the transcanada in New Brunswick the options should become more abundant again.

Moving day? (transport hauling a mobile home into the campground)

Moving day? (transport hauling a mobile home into the campground)

Me thinks there has been a fire recently at the campground office

Me thinks there has been a fire recently at the campground office

 

Day 116: August 8 – Portneuf to Quebec City

Daily Distance = 70.11km, Trip Total = 4,473.10km

I continue to luck out weather wise.  Last night it poured rain from about 2am onwards (they were calling for it, so I had all my gear tucked away nicely under my tent).  When I woke up around 7am there was a break in the weather and it stopped raining for 2hrs.  Just enough time for me to get packed up, fed, and on the road.

Fortunately I had set up the tent on a higher level of land so I didn't get rain-logged overnight.

Fortunately I had set up the tent on a higher level of land so I didn’t get rain-logged overnight

As I rolled out of the campground it started raining.  A-ok with me.  It sprinkled on and off until about noon and after noon it was all clear skies.

Heading into Saint-Augustin I noticed two other cyclists loaded up with gear pulled off to the side of the road so I pulled over and we chatted.  They are brothers who are cycling from Montreal to Quebec City and will meet with their wives in Quebec City.  It sounds like the one brother has done a fair amount of touring in the past and he’s trying to get his brother hooked on this lifestyle.  They said they had started out with 3 cyclists, but one took an ambulance home on day 1 or 2 (he’s ok tho!).  We headed out for a grocery store where they offered to watch my bike while I picked up some food.  How nice to have my stuff looked after when I slip into a store to pick something up!  Usually I just hold my breath and hope everything is still there when I get back!

Me in front of the farmland in Quebec

Me in front of the farmland in Quebec

Two brothers cycling from Montreal to Quebec City

Two brothers cycling from Montreal to Quebec City

And we're off to find FOOD!

And we’re off to find FOOD!

From Saint Augustin into Quebec City I came across many detours due to construction.  By about the 4th detour I was getting a little sour, this was enhanced because the terrain was no longer flat.  In fact there was one hill that was at a 12 degree grade (this is STEEP).  My arms actually got sore as I pushed my bike up this hill, I needed to take several breaks to rest my arms.  You realize just how much gear you are hauling when you have to push it up a hill!  After a couple small loops (some because of construction detours and some because I got lost), I made it to my hotel in Quebec City where I was gladly and soundly asleep by 10pm.

Construction at the bottom of a hill?  This reduces the joy of coasting down a hill a bit

Construction at the bottom of a hill? This reduces the joy of coasting down a hill a bit

I ignored this detour and got to ride (car free) through a nice newly built roundabout

I ignored this detour and got to ride (car free) through a nice newly built roundabout

St. Lawrence from the outskirts of Quebec City

St. Lawrence from the outskirts of Quebec City

More detour signs (notice they actually called out the bike detour too)

More detour signs (notice they actually called out the bike detour too)

My response to seeing yet another detour

My response to seeing yet another detour

This is the bridge I'll be taking to cross the St. Lawrence on Sunday?  Hmm - it looks busy.  I think I should research this a bit more ahead of time.

This is the bridge I’ll be taking to cross the St. Lawrence on Sunday? Hmm – it looks busy. I think I should research this a bit more ahead of time.

I was on a mission to get to my hotel, so this was the only pic of Quebec City I snapped today (more later when I go sightseeing)

I was on a mission to get to my hotel, so this was the only pic of Quebec City I snapped today (more on a later date when I go sightseeing)

Osheaga

Day 110-112: August 2 to 4 – Montreal

The long weekend was spent catching up on some serious R&R (slept 10+hrs 3 of the 4 nights in Montreal), taking in the Osheaga Music Festival and a couple quick strolls downtown Montreal (not much sightseeing as I’ve been to Montreal before).

Near Old Port Montreal

Near Old Port Montreal

Old Port Montreal

Old Port Montreal

Downtown Montreal

Downtown Montreal

Building near Old Port Montreal

Building near Old Port Montreal

One of these private boats generated A LOT of discussion on the docks

One of these private boats generated A LOT of discussion on the docks

Downtown Montreal

Downtown Montreal

Downtown Montreal

Downtown Montreal

P1030758

The stage

The stage

 

People climbing a tree at Osheaga

People climbing a tree at Osheaga

Tony and me

Tony and I at Osheaga

Viv and I at Osheaga

Viv and I at Osheaga

Viv and I in front of an Osheaga sign

Viv and I in front of an Osheaga sign

Tony, Viv and I

Tony, Viv and I

A bit blurry, but sharing some laughs at Osheaga

A bit blurry, but sharing some laughs at Osheaga

Mumford & Sons at Osheaga

Mumford & Sons at Osheaga

The metro ride home from Osheaga

The metro ride home from Osheaga