Archive for New Brunswick

Trees, Trees and more Trees

Day 131: August 23 – Miramichi to Bouctouche

Daily Distance = 112.15km, Trip Total = 5,306.33km

Today was a pleasant surprise on the weather front – they were calling for rain until early afternoon and instead I only got a couple quick sprinkles.  Temperature had also cooled off and was a very comfortable low 20’s.

Crossing the bridge in Miramichi - I was happy for the dedicated bike lane!

Crossing the bridge in Miramichi – I was happy for the dedicated bike lane!

Riding along the river in Miramichi

Riding along the river in Miramichi

P1040269

A bridge under construction

A bridge under construction

My route today took me mostly south on hwy 11 which sometimes had a nice wide paved shoulder and other times did not.  Overall I found traffic much more inclined to slow down and move over for me than what I was noticing a couple days previously on hwy 8.  As I left Chatham I passed by the airport which had a big banner for the Atlantic Air Show which was going to be held this weekend – darn it!  I was early by 1 day!

This is where the air show is going to be the next day

This is where the air show is going to be the next day

The rough and small shoulder of hwy 11

The rough and small shoulder of hwy 11

Around the 50km mark I was able to pick up rte 134 which was a much less trafficked road.  However it did have one common theme that has been consistent throughout New Brunswick – there are trees everywhere!  I have since been informed that New Brunswick is 85% forest and forestery is the main driving force of the economy.  After riding several days past trees, trees and more trees, I found this stat pretty easy to believe!

Trees, trees, trees

Trees, trees, trees

Me cycling amongst the trees

Me cycling amongst the trees

More acadian flags

More acadian flags

Passing through a quiet town

Passing through a quiet town

As I zipped through Saint-Louis I saw a sign for fresh smoothies – I had to pull over for a quick break.  After savouring my peach, kiwi, banana & raspberry smoothie I was back on the road.

A great spot for a fresh smoothie

A great spot for a fresh smoothie

Hanging out at a park in Richibucto

Hanging out at a park in Richibucto

In Richibucto I made a left hand turn into a Tim Horton’s to use the washroom. This meant I had to make the dreaded left hand turn out of a Tim Horton’s onto a somewhat busy road with no traffic light.  It took several minutes to make the turn safely and I snapped a picture of the lineup of vehicles behind me trying to make this same turn.  How is this for a common pain felt across Canada?!?

The common Timmies car line up

The common Timmies car line up

A skeleton of a sailboat

A skeleton of a sailboat

Passing over hwy 11

Passing over hwy 11

I reached where the campground was supposed to be located on rte 475 around 5:30pm (after going 3km out of my way east of Bouctouche) to find nothing but a sign for the campground indicating it was another 7km away.  This wouldn’t have phased me if the 7km was in the direction I would be heading tomorrow, unfortunately, the 7km was actually heading north.  Pretty much the direction I just came from!  Ugh!

This is where google maps said the campground was supposed to be

This is where google maps said the campground was supposed to be

I decided to pull my bike over and scout out my other options.  A quick call to a pet friendly B&B told me that they were booked for the night, however a pet friendly hotel did still have rooms.  While I was debating what I would do a gentleman came over from across the road and we chatted about my trip.  He told me how impressed he was (in particular he seemed impressed that this trip was done with a dog – he was quick to explain his wife and he are huge animal lovers) and suggested that I use his front yard to camp for the night.  I was a bit hesitant, but he seemed nice enough, a retired fisherman who used to run a 500+ employee fishing company (primarily lobster) and with the promise of a fresh lobster dinner thrown into the mix, I couldn’t refuse the offer.  Half an hour later after my tent was setup and I was getting all my gear organized he came back out with a very apologetic expression.  Apparently his wife came home and she was ‘concerned about how her two cats would handle having a dog on their yard and that I had to go’.  I think I was more disappointed about not getting the promised fresh lobster dinner!  I grudgingly packed up my stuff and headed back into town and checked into the hotel where I was upgraded to a suite and I was quickly asleep!

Day 132: August 24 – Bouctouche to Cap-Pele

Daily Distance = 65.41km, Trip Total = 5,371.74km

After zipping through about 20km of more trees (and the occasional house and farm), I saw Gail and Jim’s car approach me from the opposite direction.  We pulled over into a driveway and got Gail’s bike off the roof rack as she would be joining me for the rest of the day’s ride!  Jim kindly offered to take Dash and my gear in the car for the day so I wouldn’t have to schlep my stuff for the rest of the day! Yay!

Crossing a bridge in Cocagne

Crossing a bridge in Cocagne

Gail once again in the lead!

Gail once again in the lead!

In Shediac we came across a bike rally and decided to stop for a drink and lunch.  We expected service to be a little slow due to all the people in town for the bike rally, but I don’t think either of us expected to wait 40min just to get our water and drinks.  Especially when everybody around us who came in after us already had their food.  And it was definitely not a good sign when around 45min a waitress came out and asked us to repeat our order just so they could ‘confirm they got it right’.  Another 30min later we finally got our food.  The drink was tasty though (or mine was at least!).

Heading out of Shediac and the bike rally

Heading out of Shediac and the bike rally

A quick ride after lunch got us to our campground by the ocean for the night where Jim had already started setting up camp and Gail had both wine and coolers on hand – does it get any better than this?  After dinner (dehydrated food), I took Dash for a walk on the low tide ocean floor and dipped my hand into the pleasantly warm ocean water.  This area is known for having the warmest fresh salt water beaches in Canada.

The beach at our campground in Cap-Pele

The beach at our campground in Cap-Pele

Looking at the warmest fresh salt water in Canada!

Looking at the warmest fresh salt water in Canada!

 

Day 133: August 25 – Cap-Pele to Amherst

Daily Distance = 58.16km, Trip Total = 5,429.90km

I knew today was going to be a relatively short ride day, but I still wanted to get an early start so I could get some errands done in the afternoon.  I was on the road by 9:30, after having said my g’bye’s to Gail and Jim.

Sun rise in Cap-Pele

Sun rise in Cap-Pele

Passed by lots of small fisheries today

Passed by lots of small fisheries today

A fishery

A fishery

An old fishing boat

An old fishing boat

P1040314

About 30km into my ride I stopped at a little community hall for a quick break. Shortly after I was stopped three cyclists rolled by.  Originally they were going to keep cycling, but after seeing all my gear they couldn’t resist coming over and chatting.  They were out for a little training spin before they cycle around the Calbot Trail next weekend (apparently it is a supported 3-day ride organized through an Atlantic Canada Cycling group).  As we were talking one of the gents mentioned another cross-Canada female cyclist he met a few weeks ago who had all of her gear stolen in New Brunswick.  I had actually heard of this same story through the gal I had met while camping in Causapscal, QC – it was one of the trio that she had ridden with from Victoria to Quebec.  Needless to say I paid particular attention to my bike and gear while in New Brunswick!

Approaching a very small town

Approaching a very small town

I have found churches to be a good spot to take a break

Dash hanging out by the door hoping somebody will let her in!

Cyclists out for their weekend ride

Cyclists out for their weekend ride

Where does the water end and the sky start?

Where does the water end and the sky start?

More New Brunswick trees

More New Brunswick trees

A couple km’s later I saw a sign indicating I was now in Nova Scotia.  Given that I was on a relatively quiet country road (rte 970 and turning onto rte 366), I wasn’t sure that there would be a sign indicating my crossing of the province, so I was happy there was!  Even better – when I turned around there was a ‘welcome to new brunswick’ sign – this was more than I saw when I actually crossed into New Brunswick so I had to turn around and get a quick picture in front of that sign too.

A proper New Brunswick sign

A proper New Brunswick sign

And on to Nova Scotia!!!

And on to Nova Scotia!!!

These old lobster traps were common at the end of country driveways in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick

These old lobster traps were common at the end of country driveways in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick

Clear sky and quiet road.  Cycling bliss!

Clear sky and quiet road. Cycling bliss!

Nova Scotia like New Brunswick has a lot of trees, but there are actual views (New Brunswick is where I learned the meaning of the expression 'you can't see the forest for the trees')

Nova Scotia like New Brunswick has a lot of trees, but there are actual views (New Brunswick is where I learned the meaning of the expression ‘you can’t see the forest for the trees’)

I liked the clouds

I liked the clouds

Cows!

Cows!

When I made it to the downtown core of Amherst I pulled over for about 15 minutes and listened to a live band that was singing some oldies to a pretty big crowd (or what I assume to be a pretty big crowd for a relatively small town).  I made it to my hotel around 2pm and spent the afternoon hiding from the sun, getting caught up on emails and the blog.

Taking in the band in Amherst

Taking in the band in Amherst

I haven't had a bike shot for a while :)

I haven’t had a bike shot for a while :)

 

The Acadian Route

Note: Nov. 24th – Pictures are now updated!

Day 127: August 19 – Campbellton to Dalhousie

Daily Distance = 25.34, Trip Total = 5,021.91km

After spending a few minutes chatting with some of the hotel staff and Dash adequately begging and receiving a treat, I was on the road for the very short and quick 25km ride to Dalhousie.

This was an enjoyable stretch of quiet road along 134.  I noticed at some point in today’s ride that I haven’t passed a welcome to New Brunswick sign, so instead I took a picture of a road sign ‘NB 134’ – that will have to suffice.

Hello New Brunswick!

Hello New Brunswick!

The most notable part of today’s ride?  Being on a quiet road again and hearing nothing but the whir of my tires as they traverse the paved road.  What a soothing ride.

Dalhousie

Dalhousie

Industry in Dalhousie

Industry on Dalhousie’s waterfront

Not much water access in Dalhousie

Not much water access in Dalhousie

Boat shaped amphitheatre in Dalhousie

Boat shaped amphitheatre in Dalhousie

Dalhousie is a hilly town

Dalhousie is a hilly town

 

Day 128: August 20 – Dalhousie to Bathurst

Daily Distance = 86.14km, Trip Total = 5,108.05km

One of my nightly rituals before a ride day is to take a look at the forecasted weather (temperature, wind direction and velocity) for my current location as well as my anticipated destination for the next day.  It sounds silly, but this helps me visualize and mentally prepare myself for the next day’s ride a bit – will I have a headwind, crosswind or tailwind?  Is the temperature going to be hot – if so I make sure I have an extra bottle of water or two.  If it’s going to rain, then I need my rain gear handy and should wear my contacts instead of glasses.  Last night’s forecast?  A headwind and 40% chance of 1mm of rain (uh-oh – I remember what happened last time that was the forecast).  The headwind proved true.  Rain wise, there was a couple hours of mist in the morning, but then it stopped and just remained as an overcast day – so not too bad.

Between Dalhousie and Charlo

Between Dalhousie and Charlo

Getting ready to take the boat out

Getting ready to take the boat out

This was the coolest stretch of road on today's ride

This was the coolest stretch of road on today’s ride

The majority of my route in New Brunswick will be along the Acadian Coastal Route.  This is a french settled area however everybody I’ve bumped into seems to be bilingual and I am hearing conversations around me in both english and french.  There is definite evidence that I have just missed Acadian Day by a few days (celebrated Aug. 15th) as acadian flags are everywhere!

New Brunswick has a handful of tourist routes to follow.  This is where the appalachian route ends and the acadian coastal route begins

New Brunswick has a handful of tourist routes to follow. This is where the appalachian route ends and the acadian coastal route begins

Canada flag and acadian flag

Canada flag and acadian flag

Town of Charlo

Town of Charlo

Considering that I’m on a coastal route, I’m not always within view of the water – which is actually a blessing today given the headwind, the trees around me provide a bit of shelter!

Some of the rare glimpses of water on today's ride

Some of the rare glimpses of water on today’s ride

Another water view with the all too familiar train tracks

Another water view with the all too familiar train tracks

Normal size churches are seen again in New Brunswick (unlike the grandiose churches found in Quebec)

Normal size churches are seen again in New Brunswick (unlike the grandiose churches found in Quebec)

Most of today's scenery

Most of today’s scenery

This horse kept a close eye on Dash and I!

This horse kept a close eye on Dash and I!

Passing by a log mill

Passing by a log mill

Industrial area just west of Belledune

Industrial area just west of Belledune

Same industrial area

Same industrial area

Belledune

Belledune

A rare glimpse of the water

A rare glimpse of the water

The acadian flag painted on telephone poles through town

The acadian flag painted on telephone poles through town

A first happened on today’s ride and not a particularly pleasant first – I got my first saddle sore.  I’m happy that I’m only experiencing this discomfort near the end of my adventure, but I’m also a bit baffled that it would happen now.  At first I thought this was caused due to the combination of a bumpy road, pushing into the headwind and limited coasting.  But after looking at my saddle tonight I’ve noticed that a tiny little bit of protective leather has chipped out of the saddle – this is screaming for a temporary duct tape repair!

A house in need of renovations

A house in need of renovations

Once settled into the hotel in Bathurst I headed over to the grocery store across the street and picked up a store made salad, a hummus and flatbread snack and a chocolate milk.  Dinner of champions!

 

Day 129: August 21 – Bathurst to Miramichi

Daily Distance = 86.13km, Trip Total = 5,194.18km

Today I was going to be venturing off the acadian coastal route and decided instead to take the more direct route between Bathurst and Miramichi along rte 134 and hwy 8.  It was probably way more hilly than the coastal route as I headed through a rolling forested area and only passed through one town the entire day (a very small town called Alderville), however it was also 100km shorter so it seemed like an easy choice.

Leaving Bathurst

Leaving Bathurst

Rte 134 was a joy to bike on – quiet country paved road.  Hwy 8 wasn’t as pleasant, the paved shoulder was only about 1/2 foot wide and the speed limit was 100.  Cars speeding by wasn’t an issue, but very few of the transports or mack trucks seemed willing to slow down when there was oncoming traffic, so I would usually ditch to the gravel shoulder ’till they passed.  If it weren’t for the head/cross wind, I probably could have held my ground on the limited paved shoulder and there would have been room for all of us, but with the wind my bike drifts a bit (I’m not particularly aerodynamic with 4 panniers a handlbar bag and a trailer), the drifting becomes more of a concern when you factor in the draft created by these bigger vehicles.

Quiet road along rte 134

Quiet road along rte 134

Hwy 8 - one of the few spots that actually had a paved shoulder

Hwy 8 – one of the few spots that actually had a paved shoulder

Some downed trees along why 8

Some downed trees along why 8

This is what the shoulder looked like for most of the ride along hwy 8

This is what the shoulder looked like for most of the ride along hwy 8

Add to the hills and the headwind it was also extremely hot.  On two of my breaks today the locals would eye up my bike and me seating in the shade and mention that it is too ‘chaud’ to be biking!  At 6pm when I was about 7km from my destination I decided to look at what the temperature was – 30 degrees, 37 with the humidex and that was at 6pm!  I’m pretty sure the feels like temperature breached 40 today.  And even though I was going through a forested area, the trees were just a little too far away from the road to provide any shade while riding.

Sooo happy to see this bridge in Miramichi - it meant I was just 7km away from my destination for the day!

Sooo happy to see this bridge in Miramichi – it meant I was just 7km away from my destination for the day!

The three h’s – headwind, hot and hilly.  Remove any one of these three variables (preferably the headwind) and it would have been a pleasant day’s ride.  But all three together made for a tough slog.  You have to be very careful to keep your wits about you on a day like today.  Drink lots of water, eat properly and take breaks when your body needs ’em – first time in a while I’ve needed 3 breaks to push through 85km.  I was VERY happy to get to my hotel tonight and also know that I have a rest day tomorrow!

 

Day 130: August 22 – Miramichi

A rest day!!  After catching up on emails and the blog (much quicker given I can’t get pictures to upload yet! lol!) I headed out for a walk around town.  Miramichi is a cute little town with lots of river side area.  I was quick to find a quiet park near the water, opened up my e-reader and spent about an hour reading by the water.  Ahhhh – this is the life!

Another bridge in Miramichi

Another bridge in Miramichi

Bliss - need I say anymore?

This is bliss – need I say anymore?

Here Comes the Rain

Note: Nov. 23 – Pictures are now updated!

Day 122: August 14 – Riviere-du-Loup to Rimouski

Daily Distance = 112.27, Trip Total = 4,786.34km

This morning I said g’bye to Gail and headed out into the rain at 8am as a solo rider again.  My original stop tonight was going to be a campground at Bic National Park, however Gail’s husband Jim alerted me to the fact that dogs aren’t allowed at the National Parks in Quebec – thanks for the heads up Jim!!  This meant my closest dog friendly accommodation was Rimouski – over 110km away.

The forecast was calling for rain all day and it did not lie.  Today would be my first day on this trip where I had rain for the whole day, so I really can’t complain.  And I still stand by my statement that I will take rain over wind any day!  Around the 25km mark autoroute 20 merged with route 132, which meant I was sharing the road with the big rigs again.  For the first 45km today I also had a headwind, but a reasonably light one so it didn’t hinder me much.  I took my first break around the 45km mark where a group of individuals offered me a picnic lunch and showed genuine concern about me cycling in the rain.  I turned down the lunch only because the temperature was a bit on the cold side (around 10 degrees) and that in combination with the rain meant taking long breaks just led to the body getting cold.  So I quickly chowed down a protein bar and gel, went to the washroom, changed the batteries in my SPOT tracker, let Dash out to do her business and then jumped back on the bike.

Gail took this shot as I left the hotel this morning

Gail took this shot as I left the hotel this morning

Riviere-du-Loup

Riviere-du-Loup

Heading out of Riviere-du-Loup

Heading out of Riviere-du-Loup

The St. Lawrence from just East of Riviere-du-Loup

The St. Lawrence from just East of Riviere-du-Loup

Passing by a field of mustard flowers - the brightest part of my day

Passing by a field of mustard flowers – the brightest part of my day

A train passing through Trois-Pistoles

A train passing through Trois-Pistoles

Sharing the road with the big rigs again :)

Sharing the road with the big rigs again :)

After my break I was happy to find that the wind had changed direction and I now had a slight tailwind.  I would like to comment on the scenery that I passed along the way, but I can only assume it was beautiful.  Due to the misty/foggy/rainy haze I was only able to see anywhere from 100-500 metres ahead of me at a time.  Even though visibility was reduced I still felt safe on the road due to the wide paved shoulder and all my fluorescent gear must be doing it’s job because vehicles were giving me a wide berth.

A soggy water view

A soggy water view

The edges of Bic National Park

The edges of Bic National Park

P1040054

Still around the area of Pic National Park

Still around the area of Pic National Park

Skirting around Pic National Park

A valley skirting around Pic National Park

I was able to cover the full 112km today with only taking two short breaks.  I have been noticing over the past couple weeks that my body needs fewer and fewer breaks (and food) during the day while riding, water I always have on hand.  I generally still take the breaks when I come across a convenient location, simply ‘cuz I want to take in the scenery around me, however it’s pretty cool to see how the body adopts and improves over time and on a day like today it was mighty convenient to not necessarily need the breaks.

P1040061

Getting closer to my destination for the night - Rimouski!

Getting closer to my destination for the night – Rimouski!

Looking back at some of the climbs today

Looking back at some of the climbs today

P1040067

What are becoming some of my favourite things - a waterfall, a stream and train tracks

What are becoming some of my favourite things – a waterfall, a stream and train tracks

What luck?  These guys were going my pace!

What luck? These guys were going my pace!

Day 123: August 15 – Rimouski to Sainte-Flavie

Daily Distance = 30.95km, Trip Total = 4,817.29km

Because of the longer distance covered yesterday I opted to make today a shorter day.  And given the choice to spend the evening on the river or inland, I opted to spend one last night on the St. Lawrence river.  So my destination was Sainte-Flavie, I tiny little town on route 132 just before I would start heading inland.  The ride itself was pretty quick, only a couple hours to cover 30km going through several little coastal towns.  The biggest thing I noticed was the very, very distinct smell of salt water coming from the river – it smelt like I was already at the ocean and given that I could barely make out the sight of land on the other side of the river it had an ocean feel too.  Almost hard to believe that I am so close to the Atlantic!!

Dedicated promenade bike lane in Rimouski

Dedicated promenade bike lane in Rimouski

Watching a kite surfer with a scenic backdrop

Watching a kite surfer with a scenic backdrop

I had to zoom my camera as far as it would go to see the boats and ocean liner in the river

I had to zoom my camera as far as it would go to see the boats and ocean liner in the river

A lighthouse and submarine

A lighthouse and submarine

Close up of the submarine

Close up of the submarine

What most of my short ride looked like today

What most of my short ride looked like today

Bright coloured coastal houses

Bright coloured coastal houses

I arrived in Sainte-Flavie around 2pm and had a pleasant afternoon strolling along the beach and rocks and starring at the water as the tide came in.  Such a wonderfully relaxing afternoon.  Gail and I have noticed the tide influence on the river since our campground in Montmagny.  It seems like such a weird concept to me for a river to have a tide.

Dash checking out the view from our motel in Sainte-Flavie

Dash checking out the view from our motel in Sainte-Flavie

Taking a walk along the tidal bed

Taking a walk along the tidal bed

P1040098

Sainte-Flavie

Sainte-Flavie

Sainte-Flavie

Sainte-Flavie

P1040103

Watching the sunset in Sainte-Flavie

Watching the sunset in Sainte-Flavie

P1040106P1040107IMG_0377

Day 124: August 16 – Sainte-Flavie to Causapscal

Daily Distance = 95.58km, Trip Total = 4,912.87km

Today I felt strong.

How can you not feel good waking up to this view?

How can you not feel good waking up to this view?

Today I spent about 25 of the first 30km climbing, sometimes gradually, sometimes not so gradually and still I felt strong.

Not only was I climbing, but this herd of sheep were too

Not only was I climbing, but this herd of sheep were too

My last view of the St. Lawrence heading out of Sainte-Flavie and en route to Mont-Joli

My last view of the St. Lawrence heading out of Sainte-Flavie and en route to Mont-Joli

 

Lots of climbing today

Lots of climbing today

Hanging out on a quiet river

Hanging out on a quiet river

More climbing

More climbing

Looking back at some of the climbing

Looking back at some of the climb

A small town along route 132

A small town along route 132

The town of Sayabec and Lac Metapedia

The town of Sayabec and Lake Matapedia

On the outskirts of Sayabec

On the outskirts of Sayabec

Lake Matapedia

Lake Matapedia

Lake Matapedia

Lake Matapedia

Heading out of Sayabec

Heading out of Sayabec

The flattest land I saw today

The flattest land I saw today

These signs pop up every 10 or 15km in Quebec

These signs pop up every 10 or 15km in Quebec

 

Following the green route

Following the green route

Lake Matapedia

Lake Matapedia

Today as I approached Amqui (around the 70km mark) I looked at the skies ahead and saw that the 40% chance of less than 1mm of rain being forecasted was probably going to be closer to 100% chance of 10mm of rain, but it didn’t matter because I was still feeling strong.  I could have stopped in Amqui and missed riding in most of the rain, but I had so much energy I wanted to keep going.  Rain or not.  I did however take the chance to stop at the Subway in Amqui and have a sub thinking it might kill a bit of time as the worst of the rain passed.  As I sat on the front step outside of subway eating my sub a gentleman came by and started doing a thorough inspection of my bike.  No big deal, I’m used to the stares and the inspections, but when he started touching the handlebar bag and shaking my rear ortlieb panniers a line was crossed.  Especially considering that rear ortlieb pannier is attached to my back rack which does have that slightly loosening and shaved screw.  So I called out to him ‘can I help you?’.  He seemed slightly surprised this contraption was mine, but was quick to tell me about the time he cycled from Portland to San Diego and told me that he was just ‘testing’ how well my ortlieb pannier fit to the back rack.  Apparently my setup passed the test but I did kindly ask him to stop ‘testing’ my stuff as I still needed it to get me through the rest of this great country.

Amqui and a sudden downpour of rain

Amqui and a sudden downpour of rain

After letting the worst of the rain pass, I got back on my bike – and still I was feeling strong.  I flew the last 25km to Causapscal, the last 5km or so in the rain again.  Due to the rain I was going to try to find a motel, but the one I stumbled upon seemed to be booked up so instead I headed to the campground.  I must have spent about 30 minutes warming up in the shower and contemplating this surge of energy I have experienced today.  I have always been the kind of cyclist who prefers flat land.  I never quite understood those who said they like the challenge of the hills.  But today I got it.  The sense of accomplishment when you tackle a hill and still have energy to go for another 50+km is exhilarating!  Plus, there is more to keep you captivated on the scenery front when you don’t know what’s waiting for you at the top of the next hill or around the next bend.

Following La Route Verte 1 off the beaten path

Following La Route Verte 1 off the beaten path

P1040145

Between Amqui and Causapscal

Between Amqui and Causapscal

Crossing the river to get back to Route 132

Crossing the river to get back to Route 132

While letting dinner cook away I took Dash for a walk in the non-service area of the campground and saw another lightweight tent (albeit big – 3 or 4 person).  However I saw no sign of a car or bike.  As I turned around and headed back to my site I bumped into a fellow cyclist!  Ashleigh is the owner of the other tent, she had gotten in earlier and went into town to eat and pick up a couple beers which she kindly shared with me.  She is also cycling across Canada, she had started with two other gal friends on April 28th (around the same time as me).  So all the times through the prairies when I was being asked if I was ‘with those three girls’ – it may just have been her group that was being referred to (and here I was thinking it had to have been the Friends with Fenders ladies).  Anyway – Ashleigh spent a month in Quebec doing a french immersion program, so her trio ended up finding their own paths for the east coast.  She is hoping to get to Halifax by next Fri. to meet up with one of the trio (she’ll be doing much longer distance days than my relaxed pace!).  We spent a couple hours swapping stories, commiserating over the brutal prairie winds, seeing if we’ve bumped into any of the same cross-canadian cyclists, etc.

Today I went to sleep still feeling strong!

 

Day 125: August 17 – Causapscal to Campbellton

Daily Distance = 83.70km, Trip Total = 4,996.57km

I was really looking forward to today’s ride.  After pulling away from the St. Lawrence yesterday and climbing a bit to Lac Matapedia, today I was going to be enjoying a liesurely route following the Matapedia river back down to sea level in Campbellton.  I wasn’t disappointed.  Although there were a couple slight climbs, for the most part it was a gradual descent.  Along the way I saw several folks in the river fishing for salmon, apparently there are only specific locations where folks can fish, these are well signed along the way.  At more than one point I thought how cool it would have been to have a raft and just float my way (with gear) the 80km to Campbellton – and not because I didn’t want to be on the bike, just because I think it would have been a fun way to spend the day!

Near Causapscal

Near Causapscal

Causapscal

Causapscal

Passing by a logging company outside of Causapscal

Passing by a logging company outside of Causapscal

A monument to everyday workers

A monument to everyday workers

Old wooden covered tunnel

Old wooden covered tunnel

P1040159

Once again on the small country road

Once again on the small country road

A very typical view for the day - road with trees on one side and Matapedia river on the other

A very typical view for the day – road with trees on one side and Matapedia river on the other

Salmon fisher

Salmon fisher

The scenery was also quite stunning as I was passing through the northern reaches of the appalachian mountain range.  I’ll let the pictures do the explaining when I’m able to get them posted!

P1040171

 

P1040172

 

P1040175

 

A group of rafters enjoying a lazy river ride

A group of rafters enjoying a lazy river ride

Canoes with motors

Canoes with motors

P1040178

Lots of people on Matapedia river

Lots of people on Matapedia river

Campbellton and Sugarloaf Provincial park

Campbellton and Sugarloaf Provincial park

I continued along 132 until Pointe-a-la-Croix where I took the bridge over to Campbellton, New Brunswick – another province bites the dust!  And another time zone change.  My hotel is located right beside the bridge, so it was really easy to find.  After getting settled in and airing out my tent, washing my clothes, etc I headed out for a quick walk to check out the town.  I was immediately drawn to the wharf where I enjoyed an ice cream and a shrimp club sandwich in that order.  You know you’re in the maritimes when shrimp and lobster are standard food fare!

The bridge heading to Campbellton (connecting Quebec and New Brunswick)

The bridge heading to Campbellton (connecting Quebec and New Brunswick)

Shrimp club sandwich

Shrimp club sandwich

Walking along the promenade in Campbellton

Walking along the promenade in Campbellton

P1040193

Fishing for salmon

Fishing for salmon

Another salmon statue in Campbellton

Another salmon statue in Campbellton

 

Day 126: August 18 – Campbellton

I enjoyed an R&R day where I caught up on my blog and went for an 8km walk around Sugarloaf Provincial Park.  It was good to get on some walking trails where I could let Dash walk off leash for a while and explore.  Although I think the heat (29 degrees) got to her a bit, around the 6km mark she plopped herself on the ground near a gas station so I sat down beside her and poured some water into the left over fruit smoothie cup I had from timmies for her to drink out of.  After the past 4 or 5 days being so cool in temperature I wasn’t expecting summer like conditions to come back – hopefully they’ll stick around for more than just the day!

Walking through Sugarloaf Provincial Park

Walking through Sugarloaf Provincial Park

P1040198

Sugarloaf Provincial Park - my hike for the day

Sugarloaf Provincial Park – my hike for the day

Stopping for a much needed water break

Stopping for a much needed water break